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Indigeneity and Music: talks by Amanda Minks & Deise Lucy Montardo (Sept. 18, 12-2)

Event Start: 
Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall, Center for Ethnomusicology, Columbia University Morningside Campus, 116th St. and Broadway
The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a colloquium on:

Indigeneity and Music

featured speakers:

Amanda Minks (University of Oklahoma):
"Constructing Culture and Indigeneity on the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua"

Deise Lucy Montardo (Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Brazil; President. Brazilian Ethnomusicology Association [ABET]):
Music and Cosmology in Lowland South America: Guarani and Baniwa cases

Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014
12 noon - 2pm
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)
Columbia University Morningside Campus (B'way and 116th St.)

Free and Open to the Public

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Amanda Minks is Associate Professor in the Honors College and is affiliated with the Department of Anthropology and with the programs in Native American Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies at OU.  She earned a Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology at Columbia University in 2006, with research specializations in music-language relations and language socialization.  Her courses focus on music, language, and cultural politics in the Americas.  She also teaches a course with a global focus on intellectual property and cultural heritage.

Dr. Minks has conducted ethnographic research on the Atlantic coast of Nicaragua for over ten years.  She has examined the aesthetics and politics of play among Miskitu children living on Corn Island in her monograph Voices of Play: Miskitu Children's Speech and Song on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua (University of Arizona Press, 2013).  She has also written about Miskitu music and community media in Bilwi, in the northern autonomous region of the Atlantic coast.  Most recently, she has been studying inter-American cultural policies of the mid-20th century and their impact on discourses of development in the U.S. and in Latin America.

Dr. Minks has received grants and fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the Fulbright Institute of International Education, among others.  Her past publications include articles in the journals Pragmatics, Language and Communication, Ethnomusicology, Yearbook for Traditional Music, and Wani, as well as chapters in several edited volumes.

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George Yúdice: Vulgar musics and the challenge to the recognition of cultural heritage (Sept 8)

Event Start: 
Monday, September 8, 2014 - 4:10pm
The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents:

George Yúdice (Director, Miami Observatory on Communication and Creative Industries, University of Miami)

Vulgar musics and the challenge to the recognition of cultural heritage

Monday, Sept. 8,  2014
4.10 – 6.30pm
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)

http://works.bepress.com/george_yudice/

George Yúdice received his B.A. (Chemistry) from Hunter College, CUNY; his M.A.
(Spanish) from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana; and his Ph.D. (Romance
Languages) from Princeton University (1977). His teaching includes critical theory,
literary and cultural studies; his courses range from contemporary aesthetics and
politics to urban imaginaries, to film recreations of literary works, Mapping Miami, and
cultural policy in Latin America. He also teaches in the Program in Latin American
Studies and he is director of the Miami Observatory on Communication and Creative
Industries (www.miamiobservatory.org), which tracks work in music, theater, audiovisual, culture-based urban revitalization, cultural networks throughout the Americas, and community-based projects in South Florida


Congratulations to Dr. Marti Newland!

Dr. Martha Newland

The Center warmly congratulates Dr. Marti Newland, who successfull defended her dissertation, entitled Sounding “Black”: An Ethnography of Racialized Vocality at Fisk University, on June 23, 2014.  Her dissertation was sponsoredby Prof. Fox.

Dr. Newland has accepted a postdoctoral position as Core Lecturer (Music Humanities) at Columbia University for 2014-16.  

Congrats Marti!




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Congratulations to Dr. Nili Belkind!

Dr. Nili BelkindThe Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates Dr. Nili Belkind, who defended her dissertation on May 8, 2014.  Dr. Belkind's dissertation is entitled Music in conflict: Palestine, Israel, and the politics of aesthetic production.  It was sponsored (advised) by Prof. Christopher Washburne. 

Dr. Belkind's dissertation is an ethnographic study of the fraught and complicated cultural politics of music making in Israel-Palestine in the context of the post-Oslo era, a time of highly polarized sentiments and general retreat from the expressive modes of relationality that accompanied the 1990s peace process. In it, she examines the politics of sound and the ways in which music making and attached discourses reflect and constitute identities, and also, contextualize political action. Ethical and aesthetic positions that shape contemporary artistic production in Israel-Palestine are informed by profound imbalances of power between the State (Israel), the stateless (Palestinians of the oPt), the complex positioning of Israel’s Palestinian minority, and contingent exposure to ongoing political violence.



Congratulations to Our Graduating Seniors!

The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates the following graduating seniors who have majored in ethnomusicology or worked closely with the ethnomusicology area faculty on senior projects.  2014 was a banner year for undergraduate ethnomusicologists at Columbia!
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Veena Kumar (Independent Major in Ethnomusicology, and Biology, Columbia College) completed a senior thesis entitled "Carnatic Music in Diaspora: Tamil American Carnatic Musicians," advised by Prof. Aaron Fox. The thesis examines the bicultural musical lives of young Tamil Americans.



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Kevin Woojin Lee
(Music, and Economics, Columbia College) completed a senior thesis entitled "Crisis in the Operatic Tradition: Innovation as Violation," which examines the economic failure of the New York City Opera.



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Catherine Mullen (Ethnomusicology, Barnard College) completed a senior thesis entitled "The Jazz Mass: Experiencing Religion and Spirituality Through Non-Traditional Music," advised by Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa.  Kate has also worked extensively for the Center for Ethnomusicology in numerous capacities, as well as for the Music and Arts Library.



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Olivia Munson
(Music, Columbia College) has been awarded Departmental Honors for her essay (advised by Prof. Aaron Fox) "A Space for Musical Therapy: On Nationalism, Modernity, Music, and Medicine in the Transition from Ottoman Empire to Turkish Republic."  The essay looks at the use of music for medicinal or therapeutic purposes across broad historical span of Turkish history. 

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Debra Rosenbaum (Ethnomusicology, Barnard College) completed a senior thesis entitled "A Case Study of the NYU Steinhardt Nordoff-Robbins Center for Music Therapy: The Reception of Music Therapy as Explored through Analysis of its Research," advised by Prof. Christopher Washburne.
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Hana Rosenbaum
(Ethnmusicology, Barnard College) completed a senior thesis entitled "Making Miley 2.0: The Mechanisms Behind the Rebranding of Miley Cyrus," advised by Prof. Kevin Fellezs.




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Dr. Jessica Schwartz Appointed Assistant Professor of Musicology at UCLA!

Dr. Jessica Schwartz

The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates Dr. Jessica Schwartz, currently completing her two year term as a Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the Department, who has been appointed Assistant Professor of Musicology at The University of California, Los Angeles!

Dr. Schwartz holds the PhD in Ethnomusicology from New York University, where she completed a dissertation entitled:  "Resonances of the Atomic Age: Hearing the Nuclear Legacy in the United States and the Marshall Islands, 1945-2010," advised by Prof. Jairo Moreno.  She has published articles in, among other places,  Transactions of the Royal Historical Society,Women and Music, and Music&Politics.  Dr. Schwartz is also the founder of  the Marshallese Educational Initiative, Inc., a not-for-profit organization dedicated to expanding educational opportunities for Marshallese and raising awareness of Marshallese issues.

Lauren Flood Wins Whiting Dissertation Fellowship!

Lauren E. Flood

Lauren Flood (Ethnomusicology) has been awarded a dissertation completion fellowship for 2014-15 from the Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation. The title of her dissertation is "Building and Becoming: DIY Music Technology in New York and Berlin," and it is sponsored by Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa.








Dr. Toby King Appointed Assistant Professor of Music at UNC/Asheville!

Jonathan "Toby" King

The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates
Dr. Jonathan "Toby" King (PhD, Ethnomusicology, 2014), who has been appointed Assistant Professor of Music at The University of North Carolina at Asheville!  Dr. King's dissertation is entitled "Implications of Contemporary Bluegrass Music Performance at and around a New York City Jam Session," and it is sponsored by Prof. Aaron Fox. Dr. King defended his dissertation on June 2, 2014.  We congratulate him for that as well!

Prof. Kevin Fellezs to give Woody Guthrie Distinguished Lecture at IASPM-US

Professor Kevin Fellezs will be giving the 2014 Woody Guthrie Distinguished Lecture at the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, US Branch (IASPM-US) annual conference on Saturday, March 15, 2014, at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Fellezs's talk is titled "What Is This 'Black' In Japanese Popular Music? (Re)Imagining Race in a Transnational Polycultural Context," which focuses on his research of Black American musicians enjoying success in Japan in enka and J-Pop, two genres strongly associated with Japanese-ness, complicating conventional ideas linking identity, nationality, race, and genre.

Prof. Ellen Gray Publishes "Fado Resounding"



The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates Professor Ellen Gray on the publication of her book Fado Resounding: Affective Politics and Urban Life (Duke University Press). This ethnography of fado, Portugal's most celebrated popular music genre, shows how a musical genre can sediment, circulate, and transform affect, sonorously rendering history and place as soulful and feeling as public.

The book's introduction is currently available for preview and free download on Scribd.

 "Lila Ellen Gray positions Lisbon's amateur fado scene in terms of all the contestation about what fado is and where the action is taking place. This positioning is a unique and valuable contribution to music ethnography, and Gray does major and convincing intellectual work arguing for 'amateur' scenes as paths into the deepest musical and ethnographic understandings of genre, style, performance, poesis, and the ways that sociality is lived and experienced through sound."—Steven Feld, author of Jazz Cosmopolitanism in Accra: Five Musical Years in Ghana

Readers in the USA can receive a 20% discount on the book when ordering directly from Duke University Press (use code P13GRAY at checkout). 
http://www.dukeupress.edu/Fado-Resounding

In Europe, the book is available through Combined Academic Publishers with a 30% discount (use the code CS1113FADO).
www.combinedacademic.co.uk

In Lisbon, the book is available at the bookstore Fabula Urbis:
http://www.fabula-urbis.pt/

http://www.dukeupress.edu/Fado-Resounding/

https://www.facebook.com/FadoResounding



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