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Prof. Alexander G. Weheliye (Northwestern University): "Black Life--Schwarz-Sein." (02/02)

Event Start: 
Thursday, February 2, 2017 - 12:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a talk by:

Prof. Alexander Weheliye
(Professor, Department of African American Studies,  Northwestern University)

Black Life -- Schwarz-Sein

Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017
12:00PM-2:00PM
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)
Columbia Morningside Campus, Broadway and 116th St. 

This talk pays particular attention to the complex ways gender and sexuality function in the barring of Black flesh from the category of the human-as-Man by investigating inhabitations of the flesh that bring to light the relational being-in-the-world of Black Life. That is, examples from literature and music that render the constitutive ungendered displacement of Black Life from origin and belonging habitable by staging the affectability of Black mattering as second sight.

Alexander Weheliye is a scholar and teacher of black literature and culture, critical theory, social technologies, and popular culture. He is a Professor in the department of African American Studies at Northwestern University. Weheliye is the author of Phonographies: Grooves in Sonic Afro-Modernity (Duke University Press, 2005), which was awarded The Modern Language Association's William Sanders Scarborough Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Study of Black American Literature or Culture and Habeas Viscus: Racializing Assemblages, Biopolitics, and Black Feminist Theories of the Human (Duke University Press, 2014). Currently, he is working on two projects. The first, Black Life/Schwarz-Sein, establishes Blackness as an ontology of ungendering.The second, Feenin: R&B’s Technologies of Humanity, offers a critical history of the intimate relationship between R&B music and technology since the late 1970s.

Prof. Amanda Weidman (Anthropology, Bryn Mawr): Trading Voices: The Gendered Beginnings of Playback in South India (Mon 12/5, 4P

Event Start: 
Monday, December 5, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a talk by:

Prof. Amanda Weidman (Anthropology, Bryn Mawr College)

Trading Voices: The Gendered Beginnings of Playback in South India

Monday Dec. 5, 2016
4-6PM
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)
Free and Open to the Public
Reception to Follow

Description: This talk examines the period of transition from singing actors and actresses to the playback system in the South Indian Tamil language film industry, focusing on its gendered beginnings as a form of experimentation with female voices and bodies in the 1940s.  I examine the discourse around actresses that viewed them as fragmentable entities, discussed in terms of natippu (acting), pattu (singing), nattiyam (dancing), and azhaku (looks, beauty); debates about the practice of iraval kural, the “traded” voice; and the ways that female voice-body relationships were constructed and managed in films of the late 1940s and early 50s, in which a system of differentiated female voices accomplished crucial ideological work.  

More broadly, I argue that playback lent itself to the typification of characters, since the character traits of the onscreen body, rather than being voiced by the actress with whatever kind of voice she might have, could be accentuated by the use of a “suitable” playback voice. With its constructed pairing of voices and bodies, playback theoretically made gender crossings and “cross-dressed” voices possible, but in this context it in fact led to a greater regimentation of voice-body relationships and gendered vocal sound—a regimentation that would be realized concretely in the vocal domination of a very few playback singers later in the 1950s. 

Amanda Weidman is a cultural anthropologist with interests in music, language, performance, technological mediation, and semiotics.  She has conducted research in South India for more than 20 years, and is currently at work on a book project on the aesthetics and ideologies that govern playback singing in the South Indian Tamil film industry.  She is a member of the Anthropology Department at Bryn Mawr College, where she teaches courses in Linguistic Anthropology, Anthropology of Sound and Media, History of Anthropological Theory, and contemporary South Asia. She is also a Karnatic violinist.  She holds the PhD in Anthropology from Columbia University, and is the author of Singing the Modern, Voicing the Classical (Duke U. P. 2006).

Nicola Scaldaferri (Univ. of Milano): The Ethnomusicologist & his Zampogna (Thurs. Dec 1, 4PM)

Event Start: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents a Talk By:

Prof. Nicola Scaldaferri
(University of Milano, Italy)

The Ethnomusicologist and his Zampogna. Collaborative Research in Basilicata (Southern Italy)

Thursday Dec. 1, 2016
701C Dodge Hall
Free and Open to the Public 
Reception to Follow

The presentation discusses the author's experience in the field as a bagpipes player (the instrument is the Italian zampogna, a double chanter instrumentin his home region, in Basilicata, in Southern Italyespecially during festivals and religious rituals; and more recently, also in other contexts, as a way of building a common ground with local musiciansA particular focus will be on the festival Maggio di Accettura, the object of a collaborative research done in team, with Steven Feld and photographs Stefano Vaja and Lorenzo Ferrarini. It will be introduced by a description of the instruments and musical repertory.

Nicola Scaldaferri is associate professor at the University of Milan, where is the director of the LEAV (Laboratory of Ethnomusicology and Visual Anthropology). He received his PhD in Musicology at the University of Bologna, the degree in Composition at the Conservatory of Parma; he was Fulbright scholar at Harvard University, and visiting professor at St. Peterburg State University. His interests include 20th century music and technology, Balkan epics, Italian folk music, instruments from Western AfricaAs performer he plays zampogne and other Italian folk instruments.

Prof. John Troutman: "Steel Bars and Hawaiian Guitars" - Friday Nov. 4, 2016, 4PM

Event Start: 
Friday, November 4, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Center for Ethnomusicology is please to present a colloquium presentation by:

Prof. John W. Troutman

(History and Geography, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, author of Indian Blues and the new Kika Kila)

speaking on:
"Steel Bars and Hawaiian Guitars: (Re)Centering Indigenous Technology and Musical Practice within the Origins of the Modern Music Industry."

Friday November 4, 2016
4:00PM to 6:00PM 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)
Reception to follow talk
Information: aaf19@columbia.edu

Free and open to the public!

The Hawaiian steel guitar profoundly altered the early twentieth-century sounds of the modern music industry. However, few scholars have acknowledged the instrument's role in shaping the soundtrack of modernity, let alone its indigenous origins.  In this talk, John Troutman will draw from his new book, Kīkā Kila: How the Hawaiian Steel Guitar Changed the Sound of Modern Music, in order to contemplate the efforts of Hawaiians to develop a new instrument within the context of intense colonial upheaval, and their impact along regional theater circuits and on New York City stages in the years that followed.

Interested members of the public are also invited to attend Prof. Fox's class "Music in Contemporary Native America" on Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, from 6-7:30pm, to hear Prof. Troutman discuss his important first book, Indian Blues. Please defer to students in the class during discussion if you attend. 


John Troutman is Associate Professor of History at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He received his doctorate in history from the University of Texas at Austin and his master’s degree in American Indian Studies from the University of Arizona. He has received multiple fellowships and grants from the Smithsonian Institution, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. His research agenda focuses on the historical significance of music in American life, particularly in the lives of indigenous peoples. His first book, Indian Blues: American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1879-1934, was favorably reviewed in journals that span the disciplines of American Studies, History, Musicology, Anthropology, Folklore, and American Indian Studies; among other accolades it won the Western History Association’s biennial W. Turrentine Jackson Award for a "first book on any aspect of the American West.” In May of this year, the University of North Carolina Press published his second monograph, Kīkā Kila: How the Hawaiian Steel Guitar Changed the Sound of Modern Music. The book chronicles the history of the Hawaiian steel guitar, from the cultural and political context that produced it in the Islands in the 1880s, to its role in shaping the sounds of modern music in North America and throughout the world.

______________________

Prof. Zuzana Jurkova -- "Music Representation of an Underprivileged Group: the Case of the Czech Roma" (10/27 4PM)

Event Start: 
Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents:

Dr. Zuzana Jurková 
(Head of the Institute for Ethnomusicology, Faculty of Humanities, Charles University, Charles University, Prague)

Music Representation of an Underprivileged Group:
the Case of the Czech Roma

Thursday,  October 27, 2016
4:00pm – 6:00pm
701c Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)
Columbia University Morningside Campus
Free and Open to the Public, Reception to Follow Talk

Abstract: Although the Roma are the most numerous minority in the Czech Republic (ca. 3% of the population) they did not established any mechanism for the selection of political or cultural representatives. In fact, the Roma who reach influential positions negotiate and construct their roles in accordance to who they were elected to represent and those they face. Because of this situation, there is no coherent way of Roma representation through music despite the fact that such a representation is regarded by the public opinion as the most positive aspect of Romani culture which can be used as a marker of collective identity and, at the same time, as a powerful “diplomatic” tool (Lundberg 2010). This talk focuses on two different aspects of Romani musical representations in the Czech Republic: individual and institutional. In the first case, I analyze how two of the most distinguished and visible “Romani” musicians construct their musical styles and, in turn, how various groups consider these styles as Romani. In the second case, the talk focuses on Džemil and Jelena Silajdžič, the managers of the biggest European Romani festival held annually in Prague (Khamoro). I discuss the profound influence that these two managers have on the (re)presentation of Romani music in the Czech Republic, and analyze the role of the Silajdžičs as mediators of the perception of Romani music(s) among the majority, among Roma themselves.  

Zuzana Jurková studied ethnology and musicology at the Philosophical Faculty of Charles University and at the music conservatory in Brno. She is the head of the Institute for Ethnomusicology at the Faculty of Humanities of Charles University, focused mainly on the the research of musics of minorities (Voices of the Weak, 2009; Sounds from the Margins, 2013). She concentrates on Romani music (including numerous publications, and an Open Society Fund grant in 1996-8), on the history of Czech ethnomusicology (Ph.D. 1996, a Fulbright scholarship in Bloomington, USA, 1998) and, in recent years, on urban ethnomusicology (Pražské hudební světy 2013; Prague Soundscapes 2014)

Dr. Robin Gray (UC Santa Cruz) -- "Repatriation and Decolonization: Thoughts on Ownership, Access, and Control" (Friday Sept. 30

Event Start: 
Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)
The Center for Ethnomusicology is pleased to welcome:
Dr. Robin R. R. Gray (Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow in History, University of California, Santa Cruz)

speaking on:  "Repatriation and Decolonization: Thoughts on Ownership, Access, and Control."

Friday, Sept. 30, 2016
4PM-6PM (reception to follow)
701C Dodge Hall
Free and Open to the Public

_____________
Members of the public are also invited to join Dr. Gray for a session of Prof. Aaron Fox's class "Music in Contemporary Native America" on:

Thursday, Sept. 29, 6PM-7:30PM, 701C Dodge Hall


This presentation is based on an assigned reading from Dr. Gray's PhD dissertation: "Ts'msyen Revolution" Chaps 1-4.

Bio: Dr. Robin Gray (Ts’msyen) holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology (2015), and a Graduate Certificate in Indigenous Studies (2015) from the University of Massachusetts.  She is currently a President’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her work engages in multi-sited, community-based research projects involving the international repatriation of Ts’msyen songs from archives, and embodied heritage reclamation in an urban Ts’msyen dance group. She is also developing a comprehensive knowledge dissemination strategy based on the topic, Researching, Representing and Repatriating Ts’msyen Cultural Heritage.  

Dr. Gray's website can be viewed at:   
http://www.robingray.ca

For more information contact Aaron Fox at aaf19@columbia.edu

Els Lagrou -- Cashinahua Song-Images: Reflections on an Amerindan Relational Aesthetics (Thurs April 28, 5pm)

Event Start: 
Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 5:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Spring 2016 Ethnomusicology Colloquium Series Presents: 

Cashinahua Song-Images: Reflections on an Amerindan Relational Aesthetics

Els Lagrou  

(Associate Professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) Graduate Program in Sociology and Anthropology, CNPq (National Council for Scientific and Technological Development) Researcher Coordinator of NAIPE –Center of Amerindian Studies)

April 28, 2016 5:00 pm 
701c Dodge Hall 
Columbia University Center for Ethnomusicology
Free and Open to the Public

Columbia University Morningside Campus

Richard Jankowsky "Ritual Journeys and Devotional Niches: Ambient Sufism in Tunisia" (Tues. March 22, 5-6pm)

Event Start: 
Tuesday, March 22, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)
The Center for Ethnomusicology announces a talk by:

Richard Jankowsky (Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology, Tufts University)
"Ritual Journeys and Devotional Niches: Ambient Sufism in Tunisia" 

Tuesday March 22
4:10pm-6pm 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)
Free and Open to the Public

Jankowsky Talk Poster

“Ritual Journeys and Devotional Niches: Ambient Sufism in Tunisia” 

In Tunisia, trance rituals animated by praise songs to Sufi saints are not exclusive to members of Sufi orders or participants in Sufi ceremonies. Rather, a number of distinct healing and devotional musical traditions co-exist, each associated with particular social and devotional communities. In this paper I bring together four such traditions, those of women, Jews, blacks, and hard-drinking laborers, to demonstrate how each of their musical practices serves as a musical, social, and devotional niche while contributing to a larger ecology of Sufi music that also includes the great variety of Sufi rituals as well as staged concerts. 

More specifically, while the musical “journey” (riḥla) through a chain (silsila) of praise songs is a metaphorical image and organizational scheme that is shared by each of these traditions, the nature of the journey and the different destinations along the way musically mark each one as distinctive and representative of the particular histories and devotional itineraries of each ritual community. This paper emphasizes the important role of women and minorities in cultivating Sufi aesthetics, and shows how Sufism resonates throughout Tunisian society via listening publics associated with numerous genres of music—both “sacred” and “secular”—that evoke the spiritual and therapeutic power of music and trance. 

Based on ethnographic research between 2009 and 2015, this presentation takes as its starting point the changing politico-religious climate after the Tunisian Revolution of 2011 and the concomitant threats to the survival of musical practices associated with Muslim saints.     

___________________________

Richard Jankowsky (PhD, University of Chicago) is Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology at Tufts University, where he is also Director of the Graduate Program in Music. His book Stambeli: Music, Trance, and Alterity in Tunisia (University of Chicago Press, 2010) received honors from academic societies in ethnomusicology, anthropology, and North African studies. His most recent publications include essays on ritual and the space of betweenness (in Resounding Transcendence: Transitions in Music, Ritual, and Religion, Oxford University Press, 2016) and jazz and the democratic imagination (in Jazz Worlds/World Jazz, University of Chicago Press, 2016), and, as editor, the Middle East and North Africa volume of the Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World (2015). His current book project examines the politics and circulation of Sufi ideas and aesthetics through musical routes that rely on, yet transcend, genre distinctions in pre- and post-revolutionary Tunisia.

Louise Meintjes (Duke U): "Ululation" (Fri Nov 13, 2015, 4pm)

Event Start: 
Friday, November 13, 2015 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall, Center for Ethnomusicology

The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a talk by:

Prof. Louise Meintjes
(Departments of Anthropology and Music, Duke University)

"Ululation"

Date:  Friday, November 13, 2015
Time: 4:00PM
Location: 701C Dodge Hall, Center for Ethnomusicology. (Columbia University Morningside Campus at 116th St.
(Location Map)

Free and open to the public; reception to follow talk.

Louise Meintjes is Associate Professor of Music and Cultural Anthropology at Duke University and author of Sound of Africa! Making Music Zulu in a South African Studio (Duke UP 2003).  Her new book,  Dust of the Zulu: Ngoma Aesthetics after Apartheid, is forthcoming on Duke University Press in 2016.

Carlos Sandroni - ""Mário de Andrade (1893-1945) and the music of Northeastern Brazil" (Mon. Oct. 26, 4pm)

Event Start: 
Monday, October 26, 2015 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)

The Center for Ethnomusicology Colloquium Series Presents:

Prof. Carlos Sandroni 
(Ethnomusicology, Federal University of Pernambuco [Recife], Brazil) 

"Mário de Andrade (1893-1945) and the music of Northeastern Brazil"

Monday Oct. 26, 2015
4:10PM
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)
Free and Open to the Public

______________________________________

Carlos Sandroni was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1958.  He studied Sociology and Political Sciences in the university of Rio, and guitar in private lessons. He did a doctorate in Musicology in France, at the Université de Tours. His dissertation (finished in 1997) was in the early history of samba, and it was published in Rio in 2001. The early history of Brazilian popular music (roughly, 1880-1940) remains a field of interest.

Sandroni came back to Brazil in 1997 and since then has taught Ethnomusicology at the Federal University of Pernambuco (Recife). The Brazilian Ethnomusicology Association was founded in 2001 and Sandroni was its first president (2001-2004). In 2004, the Brazilian Ministry of Culture hired him to work on the Brazilian nomination for the Intangible Cultural Heritage list of Unesco, samba-de-roda from Bahia. The nomination was accepted by Unesco. Since then he has developed a second important field of research: the impact of the public policies related to Intangible Cultural Heritage on popular musicians and dancers from Northeastern Brazil.

In 2007,Sandroni was a Tinker Visiting Professor at the University of Texas at Austin. In 2008, he was an Associate Researcher at the Center for Ethnomusicology Research in Paris.

Sandroni published an earlier book, on the Brazilian writer-musicologist Mário de Andrade and his work on public culture (São Paulo, 1988). He also co-edited two other volumes with colleagues: one about the samba de roda from Bahia (Brasília, 2007), and another about the public policies on intangible heritage (Recife, 2014).

He has published two collections of field recordings. One is a double CD on traditional music from Pernambuco and the neighbor state of Paraíba (Recife, 2005), and the other is a single CD on samba de roda music (Salvador, 2006).

As a singer, guitarist, and songwriter, Sandroni published in 2014 the CD "Sem regresso."

His current projects are a collection of articles on the history of Brazilian popular music, and a book on the Intangible Heritage Policies in Brazil.

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