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Adam Kielman Appointed Assistant Professor at Chinese University of Hong Kong, Completes Doctorate

The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates our newest PhD alumnus, Dr. Adam Kielman!  Dr. Kielman, who also holds his undergraduate degree in East Asian Studies from Columbia, defended his dissertation, Zou Qilai!: Musical Subjectivity, Mobility, and Sonic Infrastructures in Postsocialist China, on Dec. 1, 2016.  His dissertation, abstracted below, was advised by Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa, and his committee included Profs. Chris Washburne, Kevin Fellezs, Fred Lau (U Hawai'i), and Timothy Oakes (U Colorado/Boulder).

We also warmly congratulate Dr. Kielman on his acceptance of an Assistant Professorship in Music at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, which he will begin in January, 2017.  

Congratulations to Adam!

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Adam Kielman: Zou Qilai!: Musical Subjectivity, Mobility, and Sonic Infrastructures in Postsocialist China
Abstract

This dissertation is an ethnography centered around two bands based in Guangzhou and their relationships with one of China’s largest record companies. Bridging ethnomusicology, popular music studies, cultural geography, media studies, vocal anthropology, and the anthropology of infrastructure, it examines emergent forms of musical creativity and modes of circulation as they relate to shifts in concepts of self, space, publics, and state instigated by China’s political and economic reforms. Chapter One discusses a long history of state-sponsored cartographic musical anthologies, as well as Confucian and Maoist ways of understanding the relationships between place, person, and music. These discussions provide a context for understanding contemporary musical cosmopolitanisms that both build upon and disrupt these histories; they also provoke a rethinking of ethnomusicological and related linguistic theorizations about music, place, and subjectivity. Through biographies of seven musicians working in present-day Guangzhou, Chapter Two outlines a concept of “musical subjectivity” that looks to the intersection of personal histories, national histories, and creativity as a means of exploring the role of individual agency and expressive culture in broader cultural shifts.Chapter Three focuses on the intertwining of actual corporeal mobilities and vicarious musical mobilities, and explores relationships between circulations of global popular musics, emergent forms of musical creativity, and an evolving geography of contemporary China. Chapter Four extends these concerns to a discussion of media systems in China, and outlines an approach to “sonic infrastructures” that puts sound studies in dialogue with the anthropology of infrastructure in order to understand how evolving modes of musical circulation and the listening practices associated with them are connected to economic, political, and cultural spatialities. Finally, Chapter Five examines the intersecting aesthetic and political implications of popular music sung in local languages (fangyan) by focusing on contemporary forms of articulation between music, language, listening, and place. Taken together, these chapters explore musical cosmopolitanisms as knowledge-making processes that are reconfiguring notions of self, state, publics, and space in contemporary China.

Adam Kielman Wins Julie How Fellowship from Weatherhead Institute!

Adam Kielman

The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates PhD student Adam Kielman, who has been awarded the Julie How Fellowship by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute. The award provides support for a year of dissertation write-up to a student in history or the social sciences with a research focus on China.


Mr. Kielman, who is also an alumnus of Columbia College (EALAC major, LAJPP performer) is completing a dissertation on local popular music and politics in China under the sponsorship of Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa. 

Congratulations Adam!

PhD Alumna Dr. Lauren Flood Appointed Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at MIT!

The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates PhD alumna Dr. Lauren Flood, who has been appointed as a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Dr. Lauren Flood



















Lauren Flood earned the Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology from Columbia in 2015.  She researches sound technologies and experimental instrument building practices in the contexts of the do-it-yourself ethos, maker culture, and popular and experimental music scenes. She held a Whiting Fellowship for her dissertation, “Building and Becoming: DIY Music Technology in New York and Berlin,” with fieldwork supported by the Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies and the National Science Foundation. Lauren’s work is situated at the nexus of music, anthropology, sound studies, and science and technology studies. She engages with dialogs on critical organology, creativity and knowledge production, histories and aesthetics of sound and recording practices, vernacular technologies and everydayness, ethics and labor in the music industry, alternative methods in science and technology education, and the contemporary sense of self as mediated through the arts.

At Columbia, she has been a teaching fellow in Music Humanities and Asian Music Humanities, the graduate assistant for the Center for Ethnomusicology, an editorial board member and reviews editor for Current Musicology, and on the organizing committee of the Columbia Music Scholarship Conference. She has presented her work at annual meetings of the Society for Ethnomusicology, the American Anthropological Association, the Society for the Social Studies of Science, and the EMP Pop Conference.

Prior to her graduate studies, Lauren completed her undergraduate degree at Drexel University, with a major in music industry and a minor in anthropology. While living in Philadelphia, she studied and performed as a guitarist, worked in copyrights and licensing, and assisted with research at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. She also completed field schools in Latin American ethnomusicology and archaeology, maintaining a long-standing interest in Mesoamerica and the modern Mayan region.

Dr. Flood's Columbia PhD dissertation was advised by Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa. 

PhD Alumnus Timothy Mangin Appointed Assistant Professor of Music at Boston College!



The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates 2013 PhD program alumnus Dr. Timothy Mangin, who has just been appointed as a tenure track Assistant Professor of Music at Boston College.  

Timothy Mangin is an ethnomusicologist and musician researching the intersection of popular music, race, ethnicity, religion, and cosmopolitanism in West Africa and the African Diaspora. He received his doctorate from Columbia University in 2013 and received fellowships from the Columbia University’s Center for Comparative Literature and Society, St. Lawrence University’s Department of Music, Mellon Foundation, the Foreign Language Areas Studies Program and a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Research Abroad Program.  He taught at Columbia University, New York University, St. Lawrence University, and the City University of New York. An improvisational flutist, Tim founded St. Lawrence University’s Jazz and Improv Ensemble and also studies mbira and is a member of Capoeira Brasil.  His writings have appeared in the edited volumes Begegnungen: The World Meets Jazz and Uptown Conversations: The New Jazz Studies as well as reviews in The Yearbook for Traditional Music and Ethnomusicology On-Line. Tim is working on a book examining indigenous cosmopolitanism through the intersection of the Senegalese urban dance music called mbalax and the practice of black, Wolof (the dominant ethnic group), gendered, and Muslim identities. He is also exploring blackness in Senegalese hip hop and the dynamics of improvisation in New York City’s underground hip hop and jazz scene.  The Digital Humanities is a key part of Tim’s pedagogy and research that began when he worked at Columbia’s Institute for Research in African American Studies on the Malcolm X Project, under the direction Manning Marable, and further developed with students at The City College of New York.  

Dr. Mangin's Columbia PhD dissertation, on Senegalese mbalax, was advised by Prof. George Lewis. 

Niko Higgins Appointed Guest Faculty at Sarah Lawrence College!

Niko Higgins

The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates our alumnus Dr. Nicholas (Niko) Higgins, (PhD, Ethnomusicology, 2013), who has been appointed to a (renewable) Guest Faculty position at Sarah Lawrence College.

Dr. Higgins' PhD dissertation is entitled "Confusion in the Karnatic Capital: Fusion in Chennai, India."  It was advised by Prof. Christopher Washburne.  Dr. Higgins has previously taught at Columbia University and at The New School.

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Andrew Eisenberg Appointed Assistant Professor of Music at NYU Abu Dhabi!

The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates 2009 Columbia Ethnomusicology PhD alumnus Dr. Andrew Eisenberg, who has been appointed Assistant Professor of Music at New York University's Abu Dhabi campus!


Andrew Eisenberg














Andrew J. Eisenberg is Assistant Professor of Music at NYU Abu Dhabi.  He was Visiting Assistant Professor of Music and Anthropology at Bard College in 2013-14, and at NYUAD in 2014-15. Between 2011 and 2013, he served as Postdoctoral Research Associate in charge of the Kenya portion of the ERC Music and Digitisation Programme, while also holding a junior research fellowship at St. Catherine's College, Oxford. He earned a PhD in ethnomusicology from Columbia University in 2009, with a dissertation on vocal expression, emplacement and citizenship among marginalized Muslims of Kenya's 'Swahili coast'. A book based on his dissertation is slated for completion in 2014. Its working title is Sound and Citizenship: Voice, Place, and Belonging on Kenya's 'Swahili Coast'.
Andrew has published articles and chapters in the journal Africa, The New Encyclopedia of Africa (Scribner), Anthropology News, and the volume Music, Sound and Space: Transformations of Public and Private Experience (ed. Georgina Born, Cambridge University Press). He is currently writing three articles for the Music and Digitisation Project. Based on a year of fieldwork in Nairobi, they examine how Kenya's music recording industry has been, and continues to be, transformed by the digital revolution, the liberalisation of mass media and telecommunications, and intellectual property rights reform.

Andrew has previously held visiting posts at Northwestern University and Stony Brook University, where he has taught courses in African and African American music, and ethnomusicological theory and method

Barnard/Columbia Blues Symposium - Feb. 13-14 (free, but registration and tickets required!)

Event Start: 
Friday, February 13, 2015 - 9:00am - Saturday, February 14, 2015 - 11:00pm
Location: 
Event Oval, Diana Center, Barnard College (Enter at 117th/Broadway, accessible by 1 Train to 116th St.)

The Barnard College and Columbia University Blues Symposium will be a 2-day series of panel discussions and presentations engaging with the musical origins and cultural importance of the greatest American art form: the Blues. The Symposium has been organized by a group of Barnard and Columbia students. 

An incredible group of scholars, musicians, and writers will present on topics like the 12-bar blues, the collection of blues 78 rpm records, the 1969 Ann Arbor Blues Festival, and blues empress Bessie Smith. Panelists include Columbia's own Professor Farah Jasmine Griffin and Professor Bob O'Meally, Yale's Professor Daphne Brooks, as well as "Do Not Sell At Any Price" author and Pitchfork contributing writer Amanda Petrusich, and the Alan Lomax Archive's chief curator Nathan Salsburg.

For the full program, please click here. [6MB PDF file]

The event is free, but ticketed, and scheduled for February 13th and 14th of 2015, in the Event Oval of the Diana Center on Barnard's campus in Morningside Heights.  

To register and obtain tickets for specific programs and events please visit the following link (opens in new window). 
 

For further information, please write to:  bluessymposium@gmail.com.

Congratulations to Dr. Marti Newland!

Dr. Martha Newland

The Center warmly congratulates Dr. Marti Newland, who successfull defended her dissertation, entitled Sounding “Black”: An Ethnography of Racialized Vocality at Fisk University, on June 23, 2014.  Her dissertation was sponsoredby Prof. Fox.

Dr. Newland has accepted a postdoctoral position as Core Lecturer (Music Humanities) at Columbia University for 2014-16.  

Congrats Marti!




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Congratulations to Dr. Nili Belkind!

Dr. Nili BelkindThe Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates Dr. Nili Belkind, who defended her dissertation on May 8, 2014.  Dr. Belkind's dissertation is entitled Music in conflict: Palestine, Israel, and the politics of aesthetic production.  It was sponsored (advised) by Prof. Christopher Washburne. 

Dr. Belkind's dissertation is an ethnographic study of the fraught and complicated cultural politics of music making in Israel-Palestine in the context of the post-Oslo era, a time of highly polarized sentiments and general retreat from the expressive modes of relationality that accompanied the 1990s peace process. In it, she examines the politics of sound and the ways in which music making and attached discourses reflect and constitute identities, and also, contextualize political action. Ethical and aesthetic positions that shape contemporary artistic production in Israel-Palestine are informed by profound imbalances of power between the State (Israel), the stateless (Palestinians of the oPt), the complex positioning of Israel’s Palestinian minority, and contingent exposure to ongoing political violence.



Ethnomusicology PhD Candidate Adam Kielman Wins Three Major Prizes!














The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates Columbia Ethnomusicology PhD candidate Adam Kielman, who has won three prestigious prizes for papers presented at academic conferences, in addition to a major research fellowship (Fulbright DDRA) for his work in China.

The prizes awarded to Mr. Kielman include:

The Hewitt Pantaleoni Prize  -- Awarded by the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Society of Ethnomusicology (MACSEM) for the best student paper presented at their annual meeting held March 23-24, 2013 in Richmond, VA. Paper title: " 'Sounds like Home': Language and Place in Guangzhou's Modern Folk."

The Martin Hatch Award  -- Awarded by the Society for Asian Music (SAM) for the best student paper on Asian music presented at the annual Society for Ethnomusicology national meeting held November 1-4, 2012 in New Orleans, LA. Paper title: "Xiandai Minyao: 'Modern Folk' in Guangzhou."

The Barbara Barnard Smith Prize -- Awarded by the Association for Chinese Music Research (ACMR) to recognize an outstanding student paper in the field of Chinese music, broadly defined, presented at the annual Society for Ethnomusicology national meeting held November 1-4, 2012 in New Orleans, LA. Paper title: "Xiandai Minyao: 'Modern Folk' in Guangzhou."
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Mr. Kielman, who is also an alumnus of Columbia College (EALAC major, LAJPP performer), has also just successfully defended his doctoral dissertation proposal, entitled "Sounding Configurations of Difference in Postsocialist China."  He is preparing to depart for field research in China with support from a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship, awarded in September 2013.
Congratulations to Mr. Kielman!


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