Skip to main content

Syndicate contentnews

Music Representation of an Underprivileged Group: the Case of the Czech Roma

Event Start: 
Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 4:00pm
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents:

Dr. Zuzana Jurková 
(Head of the Institute for Ethnomusicology, Faculty of Humanities, Charles University, Charles University, Prague)

Music Representation of an Underprivileged Group:
the Case of the Czech Roma

Thursday,  October 27, 2016
4:00pm – 6:00pm
701c Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)
Columbia University Morningside Campus
Free and Open to the Public, Reception to Follow Talk

Abstract: Although the Roma are the most numerous minority in the Czech Republic (ca. 3% of the population) they did not established any mechanism for the selection of political or cultural representatives. In fact, the Roma who reach influential positions negotiate and construct their roles in accordance to who they were elected to represent and those they face. Because of this situation, there is no coherent way of Roma representation through music despite the fact that such a representation is regarded by the public opinion as the most positive aspect of Romani culture which can be used as a marker of collective identity and, at the same time, as a powerful “diplomatic” tool (Lundberg 2010). This talk focuses on two different aspects of Romani musical representations in the Czech Republic: individual and institutional. In the first case, I analyze how two of the most distinguished and visible “Romani” musicians construct their musical styles and, in turn, how various groups consider these styles as Romani. In the second case, the talk focuses on Džemil and Jelena Silajdžič, the managers of the biggest European Romani festival held annually in Prague (Khamoro). I discuss the profound influence that these two managers have on the (re)presentation of Romani music in the Czech Republic, and analyze the role of the Silajdžičs as mediators of the perception of Romani music(s) among the majority, among Roma themselves.  

Zuzana Jurková studied ethnology and musicology at the Philosophical Faculty of Charles University and at the music conservatory in Brno. She is the head of the Institute for Ethnomusicology at the Faculty of Humanities of Charles University, focused mainly on the the research of musics of minorities (Voices of the Weak, 2009; Sounds from the Margins, 2013). She concentrates on Romani music (including numerous publications, and an Open Society Fund grant in 1996-8), on the history of Czech ethnomusicology (Ph.D. 1996, a Fulbright scholarship in Bloomington, USA, 1998) and, in recent years, on urban ethnomusicology (Pražské hudební světy 2013; Prague Soundscapes 2014)

Sacramento Knoxx at the Center October 20 & 21 (Detroit rapper and activist)

Event Start: 
Friday, October 21, 2016 - 4:00pm
701C Dodge Hall
The Center for Ethnomusicology is pleased to announce two events featuring Detroit-based rapper, producer, filmmaker, and social activist Sacramento Knoxx.  

Performance/Hangout/Discussion (open to public)
Friday October 21
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology, Columbia Morningside Campus)
Refreshments to be served, open to the public 

Also: Class Session for "Music in Contemporary Native America" (open to public with limited seating)
Thursday October 20
701C Dodge Hall
Visitors welcome, please defer to students registered in class during discussions

About Knoxx

Sacramento Knoxx is a Detroit-based Anishinaabe/Chicanx rapper, producer, media artist, poet, and social activist. His work has been widely recognized in the press and online for its innovative blending of Indigenous and intersectional critiques and themes.  He was recently recognized with the 2015 Gilda Award from the Kresge Foundation.  

Learn more about Knoxx!

Sacramento Knoxx's website
Sacramento Knoxx YouTube Channel
Sacramento Knoxx on Bandcamp
Sacramento Knoxx on Facebook
Video of "Minobidmaadziwin" (collaboration with A Tribe Called Red)
Michigan Public Radio "How hip-hop helped this Ojibwe/Chicano Detroiter define himself."
Michigan Public Radio: "Detroit hip-hop musician combines art and activism."

"The aadizookaan" is an Anishinaabe word that translates into the sacred spirit of the story, the messages we share and pass on in our visits. Knoxx uses multimedia art to build interconnections between many diverse audiences, artists, media makers, organizers, educators, cultural workers, students & the many layers of communities around the world. He explores ancestral & traditional knowledge systems using contemporary tools of hiphop culture & poetry, performance, video projections, dance, film & live music production for an innovative installation of beauty & creative storytelling to educate, inspire, & motivate.  As he says, "I organize sound through motion and rhythm. My true divinity is within my ability to create. I make music. I'm a part of a movement for social change. The real revolution is the revolution of consciousness. Think and smile."

Sacramento Knoxx Photograph © Julian “DJ HE TOOK” Jacobs


Dr. Robin Gray (UC Santa Cruz) -- "Repatriation and Decolonization: Thoughts on Ownership, Access, and Control" (Friday Sept. 30

Event Start: 
Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 4:00pm
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)
The Center for Ethnomusicology is pleased to welcome:
Dr. Robin R. R. Gray (Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow in History, University of California, Santa Cruz)

speaking on:  "Repatriation and Decolonization: Thoughts on Ownership, Access, and Control."

Friday, Sept. 30, 2016
4PM-6PM (reception to follow)
701C Dodge Hall
Free and Open to the Public

Members of the public are also invited to join Dr. Gray for a session of Prof. Aaron Fox's class "Music in Contemporary Native America" on:

Thursday, Sept. 29, 6PM-7:30PM, 701C Dodge Hall

This presentation is based on an assigned reading from Dr. Gray's PhD dissertation: "Ts'msyen Revolution" Chaps 1-4.

Bio: Dr. Robin Gray (Ts’msyen) holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology (2015), and a Graduate Certificate in Indigenous Studies (2015) from the University of Massachusetts.  She is currently a President’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her work engages in multi-sited, community-based research projects involving the international repatriation of Ts’msyen songs from archives, and embodied heritage reclamation in an urban Ts’msyen dance group. She is also developing a comprehensive knowledge dissemination strategy based on the topic, Researching, Representing and Repatriating Ts’msyen Cultural Heritage.  

Dr. Gray's website can be viewed at:

For more information contact Aaron Fox at

Prof. Alessandra Ciucci: "Performing Rurality: Music and Migration across the Mediterranean" (University Seminar in Arabic Studi

Event Start: 
Thursday, October 6, 2016 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Faculty House, Columbia University
University Seminars at Columbia University

"Performing Rurality: Music and Migration across the Mediterranean (Morocco-Italy)"

Speaker: Alessandra Ciucci
Columbia University, Department of Music

Thursday, October 6, 2016

Faculty House, 7-8 pm

Alessandra Ciucci is currently Assistant Professor of Music (Ethnomusicology) at Columbia University. She received her PhD in music (ethnomusicology) from The City University of New York at The Graduate Center. Her research interests include: the music of Morocco, North Africa, the Mediterranean, music and gender, sung poetry, and music and migration. Her articles appear in Ethnomusicology, The Yearbook for Traditional Music, The International Journal of Middle East Studies, Mondi Migranti, Cahiers de musiques traditionnelles, in the Sage Encyclopaedia of Ethnomusicology, and in several edited volumes. Ciucci has been a recipient of a Fulbright foreign scholarship grant (Morocco), a fellowship from the Jewish Foundation for the Education of Women, a grant from the American Institute for Maghrib Studies Grant, and a Junior faculty summer research grant for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Dr. Ciucci was a Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Music Department at Columbia 2008-10.

Professor Ciucci will discuss the sound of a specific notion of the rural (l-‘ǝrubiya) which, through contemporary migration, travels from central Morocco across the Mediterranean to Italy. She ethnographically explores how the sound of such a notion of the rural—as a site of aesthetic behaviors, performative acts, and signifying practices—resonates across borders through ‘abidat rma—a musico-poetic genre performed at private and public celebrations and circulated through cassettes, CDs, DVDs, MP3s, and the Internet in Morocco and abroad. She argues that ‘abidat rma challenges a sonic construction of the Mediterranean which has privileged a Eurocentric mode of listening, rather than that experienced by moving and migrating bodies. To this end, Ciucci explores how Moroccan men from the central regions of Morocco, engaged in the experience and in the imagination of migration across the Mediterranean to Italy, disrupt a seamless narrative of the Mediterranean through the performance of a specific and intimate sense of the rural in sound. She examines how the poetic language, gesture, and sound of ‘abidat rma are imbued with locality, how this sung poetry gives voice to conflicts of transformation, and how it articulates the affective and sonic lives of generations of male Moroccan migrants at a transnational level.

The talk will begin at 7:00 pm. For more information or to register for the pre-talk dinner, write the seminar's rapporteur Sahar Ishtiaque Ullah ( no later than Thursday, September 29, 2016.  

For a listing of Seminars in Arabic Studies, visit

Barnard Music Major Thesis Presentations Thursday May 12, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 701C Dodge Hall

You are warmly invited to attend a presentation of senior thesis projects completed by graduating Barnard College Music/Ethnomusicology majors Esther Adams, Anna Koeck Ehrman, Jenny Payne, Gen Ambrose, and Delaney Ross.  

Featuring five 20-minute oral presentations, the event will occur on 

4:15 to 6:15PM 
701C Dodge Hall, The Center for Ethnomusicology

Reception to Follow

We are very proud of our thesis-writing students and encourage you to come and hear about their diverse and fascinating research projects. 

The presentations will be in the order below; if you are unable to attend the entire event you are welcome to drop in and out.  

4:15-4:35PM  Esther Adams — "A Naïve Mélange:" Examining Racialized Properties of Sound in Harry Lawrence Freeman’s "Jazz Opera” Voodoo 

4:40-5:00PM Anna Koeck Ehrman — The Colonial Legacy of the Ethnomusicological Archive: An Exploration of ILAM’s African Music Repatriation Project

5:05-5:25PM Jenny Payne  — Now Let's Get in Formation: the Personal and Political of "Beyoncé feminism"

5:30-5:50PM Genevieve Ambrose — Wizard Rock Heartthrobs: Power, Gender and Economics in Harry Potter Musical Fandom

5:55-6:15PM Delaney Ross — Our Hawai'i: Environmental Protest Music on the Big Island of Hawai’i

For information contact Prof Fox,

Adam Kielman Wins Julie How Fellowship from Weatherhead Institute!

Adam Kielman

The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates PhD student Adam Kielman, who has been awarded the Julie How Fellowship by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute. The award provides support for a year of dissertation write-up to a student in history or the social sciences with a research focus on China.

Mr. Kielman, who is also an alumnus of Columbia College (EALAC major, LAJPP performer) is completing a dissertation on local popular music and politics in China under the sponsorship of Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa. 

Congratulations Adam!

PhD Alumnus Timothy Mangin Appointed Assistant Professor of Music at Boston College!

The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates 2013 PhD program alumnus Dr. Timothy Mangin, who has just been appointed as a tenure track Assistant Professor of Music at Boston College.  

Timothy Mangin is an ethnomusicologist and musician researching the intersection of popular music, race, ethnicity, religion, and cosmopolitanism in West Africa and the African Diaspora. He received his doctorate from Columbia University in 2013 and received fellowships from the Columbia University’s Center for Comparative Literature and Society, St. Lawrence University’s Department of Music, Mellon Foundation, the Foreign Language Areas Studies Program and a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Research Abroad Program.  He taught at Columbia University, New York University, St. Lawrence University, and the City University of New York. An improvisational flutist, Tim founded St. Lawrence University’s Jazz and Improv Ensemble and also studies mbira and is a member of Capoeira Brasil.  His writings have appeared in the edited volumes Begegnungen: The World Meets Jazz and Uptown Conversations: The New Jazz Studies as well as reviews in The Yearbook for Traditional Music and Ethnomusicology On-Line. Tim is working on a book examining indigenous cosmopolitanism through the intersection of the Senegalese urban dance music called mbalax and the practice of black, Wolof (the dominant ethnic group), gendered, and Muslim identities. He is also exploring blackness in Senegalese hip hop and the dynamics of improvisation in New York City’s underground hip hop and jazz scene.  The Digital Humanities is a key part of Tim’s pedagogy and research that began when he worked at Columbia’s Institute for Research in African American Studies on the Malcolm X Project, under the direction Manning Marable, and further developed with students at The City College of New York.  

Dr. Mangin's Columbia PhD dissertation, on Senegalese mbalax, was advised by Prof. George Lewis. 

Congratulations to Dr. Marceline Saibou!

We warmly congratulate Dr. Marceline Saibou, who successfully defended her PhD dissertation on popular music in Togo on Friday, May 13, 2016.   Dr. Saibou's dissertation was sponsored by Prof. Aaron Fox, and her committee included Profs. Alessandra Ciucci and George Lewis (Music, Columbia), and distinguished Columbia ethnomusicology alumni Prof. Ryan Skinner (Music and African Studies, OSU) and Prof. Andrew Eisenberg (Music, NYU Abu Dhabi). 

Congratulations Dr. Saibou! 

Photo from left to right: G. Lewis, A. Ciucci, M. Saibou, A. Fox

Congratulations to Dr. Sara Snyder!

We warmly congratulate Dr. Sara Snyder, who successfully defended her dissertation on Cherokee language translational poetics and early childhood immersion education on Friday, May 6, 2016.  Her dissertation was sponsored by Prof. Aaron Fox, and her committee included Profs. Bambi Schieffelin (Anthropology, NYU), David Samuels (Music, NYU), Ana Maria Ochoa (Music, Columbia), and CU ethno alumna Prof. Amanda Minks (Anthropology, Oklahoma).

Dr. Snyder has also recently been appointed as a visiting assistant professor of anthropology and sociology at Western Carolina University in 2016-17.

Congratulations Dr. Sara Snyder!

Photo, left to right: D. Samuels, B. Schieffelin, S. Snyder, A. Ochoa, and A. Fox

Els Lagrou -- Cashinahua Song-Images: Reflections on an Amerindan Relational Aesthetics (Thurs April 28, 5pm)

Event Start: 
Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 5:00pm
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Spring 2016 Ethnomusicology Colloquium Series Presents: 

Cashinahua Song-Images: Reflections on an Amerindan Relational Aesthetics

Els Lagrou  

(Associate Professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) Graduate Program in Sociology and Anthropology, CNPq (National Council for Scientific and Technological Development) Researcher Coordinator of NAIPE –Center of Amerindian Studies)

April 28, 2016 5:00 pm 
701c Dodge Hall 
Columbia University Center for Ethnomusicology
Free and Open to the Public

Columbia University Morningside Campus

Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes