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Book Launch for Michael E. Veal and E. Tammy Kim's "Punk Ethnography: Artists & Scholars Listen to Sublime Frequencies" (02/22)

Event Start: 
Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 7:01pm - 9:01pm
Location: 
Book Culture 536 W 112th St New York, NY 10025

Please join us Wednesday, February 22nd at 7pm for a discussion of the Punk Ethnography, edited by Michael Veal and E. Tammy Kim. This talk is co-sponsored by The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University and Book Culture. It is moderated by Alessandra Ciucci from the Department of Music at Columbia University.Panelists include: Michael Veal, E. Tammy Kim, Will Glasspiegel, Rachel Lears, and Stanley Scott. .

A critical companion to the radical DIY record label that challenges the conventions of ethnography, representation, and the category of “world music.”

This ground-breaking case study examines record production as ethnographic work. Since its founding in 2003, Seattle-based record label Sublime Frequencies has produced world music recordings that have been received as radical, sometimes problematic critiques of the practices of sound ethnography. Founded by punk rocker brothers Alan and Richard Bishop, along with filmmaker Hisham Mayet, the label's releases encompass collagist sound travelogues; individual artist compilations; national, regional and genre surveys; and DVDs all designed in a distinctive graphic style recalling the DIY aesthetic of punk and indie rock. Sublime Frequencies producers position themselves as heirs to canonical ethnographic labels such as Folkways, Nonesuch, and Musique du Monde, but their aesthetic and philosophical roots in punk, indie rock, and experimental music effectively distinguish their work from more conventional ethnographic norms. Situated at the intersection of ethnomusicology, sound studies, cultural anthropology, and popular music studies, the essays in this volume explore the issues surrounding the label including appropriation and intellectual property while providing critical commentary and charting the impact of the label through listener interviews.



Alessandra Ciucci is Assistant Professor of Music (Ethnomusicology) at Columbia University. Her research interests include the music of North Africa, particular Morocco, music and gender, sung poetry, and music and migration. She is currently working on a monograph on music and the Moroccan migration to Italy.


Michael E. Veal is a musician and professor of ethnomusicology at Yale University. He is the author of several books, including Fela: The Life and Times of an African Musical Icon and Dub: Soundscapes and Shattered Songs in Jamaican Reggae.

E. Tammy Kim is a writer and member of The New Yorker's editorial staff. She previously worked as a staff writer at Al Jazeera America and as a social justice lawyer.


Wills Glasspiegel is a multimedia journalist and artist with a background in music management. His work has appeared on NPR, Fader, Vice, Dis Magazine and Afropop Worldwide, As a manager, Glasspiegel facilitated the introduction of two niche electronic music genres: Shangaan electro from South Africa and bubu from Sierra Leone. He is currently a Ph.D candidate at Yale in African-American Studies/American Studies where his work is focused around footwork, a music and dance style from Chicago, Glasspiegel's hometown.

Rachel Lears is a filmmaker, writer, and musician based in Brooklyn, New York. Her first documentary Birds of Passage (2010) explored the everyday struggles of two Uruguayan songwriters. Her most recent documentary project The Hand That Feeds follows an historic labor campaign led by undocumented immigrant workers in New York City, and is supported by the Sundance Documentary Program. She holds a Ph.D in Cultural Anthropology from New York University, and her doctoral research on media and cultural policy in Uruguay was supported by grants from Fulbright-Hays and the American Council of Learned Societies/Mellon Foundation. Her ongoing video art collaborations with artist Saya Woolfolk have screened in numerous galleries and museums worldwide.

Stanley Scott teaches Indian music at Yale and Wesleyan Universities and directs the Rangila School of Music, serving Connecticut's South Asian community. He received the 2011 Mumbai Music Award for "contribution to the cause of Indian music by an overseas-resident personality," and the 2001 lifetime achievement award from New York's Cultural Association of Bengal.  His recordings include The Weaver's Song: Bhajans of North India and a major role in Anthony Braxton's opera Trillium E. He has performed as a featured artist at Kolkatta's Rabindra Sadhan, Mumbai's NCPA and Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan, Delhi University, and New York's Chhandayan Institute.




  

   

CU Ethno Alum Prof. Adriana Helbig Publishes "Hip Hop Ukraine"

Prof. Adriana Helbig

Prof. Adriana Helbig

The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates Adriana N. HelbigAssociate Professor of Music at The University of Pittsburgh, and a 2005 alumna of the Columbia Ethnomusicology PhD program, on the publication of her book Hip Hop Ukraine: Music, Race, and African Migration (2014, Indiana University Press). 


Hip Hop Ukraine
Book Description:
 In Hip Hop Ukraine, Prof. Helbig enters a world of urban music and dance competitions, hip hop parties, and recording studio culture to explore unique sites of interracial encounters among African students, African immigrants, and local populations in eastern Ukraine. Adriana N. Helbig combines ethnographic research with music, media, and policy analysis to examine how localized forms of hip hop create social and political spaces where an interracial youth culture can speak to issues of human rights and racial equality. She maps the complex trajectories of musical influence—African, Soviet, American—to show how hip hop has become a site of social protest in post-socialist society and a vehicle for social change."


Biography: Prof. Adriana Helbig is Associate Professor of Music and an affiliated faculty member in Cultural Studies, Women's Studies, Global Studies, and the Center for Russian and East European Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. She teaches courses on global hip-hop, world music, music, gender, and sexuality, music and technology, and cultural policy. She is also founder and director of the Carpathian Music Ensemble, a student performance group that specializes in the music of Eastern Europe, including Jewish klezmer and Gypsy music. Her research has been funded through grants and research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, American Councils for International Education, IREX, and Fulbright. She has held a research fellowship at the Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington DC and was an inaugural research fellow at the Humanities Center at the University of Pittsburgh. Her articles on Romani (Gypsy) music, postsocialist cultural policy, music and piracy, music, race, and migration, and global hip-hop have appeared in edited collections and journals such as The Yearbook for Traditional Music, Current Musicology, and Popular Music. She is the coauthor, with Oksana Buranbaeva and Vanja Mladineo, of The Culture and Customs of Ukraine (Greenwood Press, 2009). 

Prof. Helbig completed her Columbia PhD in Ethnomusicology in 2005, with a dissertation entitled "Play for Me, Old Gypsy”: Music as Political Resource in the Romani Rights Movement in Ukraine, advised by Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa.

Prof. Helbig's Personal Website

Prof. Helbig's Faculty Page at the University of Pittsburgh.

Order Hip Hop Ukraine on Amazon.com

Other ordering options available through The University of Indiana Press.

Book Launch for Prof. Ana María Ochoa Gautier's "Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Colombia" (11/25, 7PM)

Event Start: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Book Culture, 536 W 112th St, New York, NY

You are invited to Book Culture Tuesday, November 25th, at 7pm for the launch of Prof. Ana María Ochoa Gautier's new book, Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Colombia, published by Duke University Press.

Event Date: Tuesday, Nov. 25th, 7:00pm
Location:  Book Culture (event link here)
536 W 112th St, New York, NY 10025

In Aurality, Ana Maria Ochoa Gautier explores how listening has been central to the production of notions of language, music, voice, and sound that determine the politics of life. Drawing primarily from nineteenth-century Colombian sources, Ochoa Gautier locates sounds produced by different living entities at the juncture of the human and nonhuman. Her "acoustically tuned" analysis of a wide array of texts reveals multiple debates on the nature of the aural. These discussions were central to a politics of the voice harnessed in the service of the production of different notions of personhood and belonging. In Ochoa Gautier's groundbreaking work, Latin America and the Caribbean emerge as a historical site where the politics of life and the politics of expression inextricably entangle the musical and the linguistic, knowledge and the sensorial.

Ana María Ochoa Gautier is Associate Professor of Music and Director of the Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University. She is the author of several books and many articles.

$24.95
ISBN: 9780822357513
Availability: Coming Soon - Available for Pre-Order Now
Published: Duke University Press - November 21st, 2014

Prof. Ellen Gray Publishes "Fado Resounding"



The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates Professor Ellen Gray on the publication of her book Fado Resounding: Affective Politics and Urban Life (Duke University Press). This ethnography of fado, Portugal's most celebrated popular music genre, shows how a musical genre can sediment, circulate, and transform affect, sonorously rendering history and place as soulful and feeling as public.

The book's introduction is currently available for preview and free download on Scribd.

 "Lila Ellen Gray positions Lisbon's amateur fado scene in terms of all the contestation about what fado is and where the action is taking place. This positioning is a unique and valuable contribution to music ethnography, and Gray does major and convincing intellectual work arguing for 'amateur' scenes as paths into the deepest musical and ethnographic understandings of genre, style, performance, poesis, and the ways that sociality is lived and experienced through sound."—Steven Feld, author of Jazz Cosmopolitanism in Accra: Five Musical Years in Ghana

Readers in the USA can receive a 20% discount on the book when ordering directly from Duke University Press (use code P13GRAY at checkout). 
http://www.dukeupress.edu/Fado-Resounding

In Europe, the book is available through Combined Academic Publishers with a 30% discount (use the code CS1113FADO).
www.combinedacademic.co.uk

In Lisbon, the book is available at the bookstore Fabula Urbis:
http://www.fabula-urbis.pt/

http://www.dukeupress.edu/Fado-Resounding/

https://www.facebook.com/FadoResounding



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CU Alum Amanda Minks Publishes "Voices of Play: Miskitu Children's Speech and Song on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua"


The Center congratulates PhD program alumna Prof. Amanda Minks (University of Oklahoma, PhD in Ethnomusicology, 2006), who has just published Voices of Play: Miskitu Children's Speech and Song on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua with the University of Arizona Press' First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies series (2013).

While indigenous languages have become prominent in global political and educational discourses, limited attention has been given to indigenous children's everyday communication. Voices of Play  is a study of multilingual play and performance among Miskitu children growing up on Corn Island, part of a multi-ethnic autonomous region on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua.

Corn Island is historically home to Afro-Caribbean Creole people, but increasing numbers of Miskitu people began moving there from the mainland during the Contra War, and many Spanish-speaking mestizos from western Nicaragua have also settled there. Miskitu kids on Corn Island often gain some competence speaking Miskitu, Spanish, and Kriol English. As the children of migrants and the first generation of their families to grow up with television, they develop creative forms of expression that combine languages and genres, shaping intercultural senses of belonging.

Voices of Play is the first ethnography to focus on the interaction between music and language in children's discourse. Minks skillfully weaves together Latin American, North American, and European theories of culture and communication, creating a transdisciplinary dialogue that moves across intellectual geographies. Her analysis shows how music and language involve a wide range of communicative resources that create new forms of belonging and enable dialogue across differences. Miskitu children's voices reveal the intertwining of speech and song, the emergence of "self" and "other," and the centrality of aesthetics to social struggle.

Amanda Minks is Associate Professor in the Honors College and is affiliated with the Department of Anthropology and with the programs in Native American Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies at Oklahoma University. She earned the PhD in Ethnomusicology at Columbia University in 2006.

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Matthew Sakakeeny publishes "Roll With It: Brass Bands in the Streets of New Orleans"


Roll With It Cover ImageMatthew Sakakeeny (Tulane University) has just published Roll With It: Brass Bands in the Streets of New Orleans (with artwork by Willie Birch)

Roll With It is a firsthand account of the precarious lives of musicians in the Rebirth, Soul Rebels, and Hot 8 brass bands of New Orleans. The gripping narrative moves with the band members from back street to backstage, before and after Hurricane Katrina, always in step with the tap of the snare drum, the thud of the bass drum, and the boom of the tuba.

Matt Sakakeeny is an ethnomusicologist and journalist, New Orleans resident and musician. An Assistant Professor of Music at Tulane University, he initially moved to New Orleans to work as a co-producer of the public radio program American Routes.  He earned the PhD in Ethnomusicology at Columbia University in 2008, where his field research was funded by the National Science Foundation.

Read the introduction to Roll With It on Scribd.

Roll With It also features a supplementary website.

Published by Duke University Press in their Refiguring American Music Series
2013
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Center for Ethnomusicology News, 2007-2008

The Center at Work
The Center for Ethnomusicology and the Graduate Program in Ethnomusicology in the Department of Music at Columbia University

Annual Report for 2007-8
(click photo to enlarge)
2007-8 has been a very busy and successful year for the Center for Ethnomusicology and the Ethnomusicology graduate program at Columbia, and there is an abundance of good news to report!

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