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Dr. Robin Gray (UC Santa Cruz) -- "Repatriation and Decolonization: Thoughts on Ownership, Access, and Control" (Friday Sept. 30

Event Start: 
Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)
The Center for Ethnomusicology is pleased to welcome:
Dr. Robin R. R. Gray (Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow in History, University of California, Santa Cruz)

speaking on:  "Repatriation and Decolonization: Thoughts on Ownership, Access, and Control."

Friday, Sept. 30, 2016
4PM-6PM (reception to follow)
701C Dodge Hall
Free and Open to the Public

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Members of the public are also invited to join Dr. Gray for a session of Prof. Aaron Fox's class "Music in Contemporary Native America" on:

Thursday, Sept. 29, 6PM-7:30PM, 701C Dodge Hall


This presentation is based on an assigned reading from Dr. Gray's PhD dissertation: "Ts'msyen Revolution" Chaps 1-4.

Bio: Dr. Robin Gray (Ts’msyen) holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology (2015), and a Graduate Certificate in Indigenous Studies (2015) from the University of Massachusetts.  She is currently a President’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her work engages in multi-sited, community-based research projects involving the international repatriation of Ts’msyen songs from archives, and embodied heritage reclamation in an urban Ts’msyen dance group. She is also developing a comprehensive knowledge dissemination strategy based on the topic, Researching, Representing and Repatriating Ts’msyen Cultural Heritage.  

Dr. Gray's website can be viewed at:   
http://www.robingray.ca

For more information contact Aaron Fox at aaf19@columbia.edu

Prof. Alessandra Ciucci: "Performing Rurality: Music and Migration across the Mediterranean" (University Seminar in Arabic Studi

Event Start: 
Thursday, October 6, 2016 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Location: 
Faculty House, Columbia University
University Seminars at Columbia University
SEMINAR IN ARABIC STUDIES presents

"Performing Rurality: Music and Migration across the Mediterranean (Morocco-Italy)"

Speaker: Alessandra Ciucci
Columbia University, Department of Music

Thursday, October 6, 2016

Faculty House, 7-8 pm


Alessandra Ciucci is currently Assistant Professor of Music (Ethnomusicology) at Columbia University. She received her PhD in music (ethnomusicology) from The City University of New York at The Graduate Center. Her research interests include: the music of Morocco, North Africa, the Mediterranean, music and gender, sung poetry, and music and migration. Her articles appear in Ethnomusicology, The Yearbook for Traditional Music, The International Journal of Middle East Studies, Mondi Migranti, Cahiers de musiques traditionnelles, in the Sage Encyclopaedia of Ethnomusicology, and in several edited volumes. Ciucci has been a recipient of a Fulbright foreign scholarship grant (Morocco), a fellowship from the Jewish Foundation for the Education of Women, a grant from the American Institute for Maghrib Studies Grant, and a Junior faculty summer research grant for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Dr. Ciucci was a Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Music Department at Columbia 2008-10.

Professor Ciucci will discuss the sound of a specific notion of the rural (l-‘ǝrubiya) which, through contemporary migration, travels from central Morocco across the Mediterranean to Italy. She ethnographically explores how the sound of such a notion of the rural—as a site of aesthetic behaviors, performative acts, and signifying practices—resonates across borders through ‘abidat rma—a musico-poetic genre performed at private and public celebrations and circulated through cassettes, CDs, DVDs, MP3s, and the Internet in Morocco and abroad. She argues that ‘abidat rma challenges a sonic construction of the Mediterranean which has privileged a Eurocentric mode of listening, rather than that experienced by moving and migrating bodies. To this end, Ciucci explores how Moroccan men from the central regions of Morocco, engaged in the experience and in the imagination of migration across the Mediterranean to Italy, disrupt a seamless narrative of the Mediterranean through the performance of a specific and intimate sense of the rural in sound. She examines how the poetic language, gesture, and sound of ‘abidat rma are imbued with locality, how this sung poetry gives voice to conflicts of transformation, and how it articulates the affective and sonic lives of generations of male Moroccan migrants at a transnational level.

The talk will begin at 7:00 pm. For more information or to register for the pre-talk dinner, write the seminar's rapporteur Sahar Ishtiaque Ullah (su2156@columbia.edu) no later than Thursday, September 29, 2016.  

For a listing of Seminars in Arabic Studies, visit http://universityseminars.columbia.edu/seminars/arabic-studies/

Els Lagrou -- Cashinahua Song-Images: Reflections on an Amerindan Relational Aesthetics (Thurs April 28, 5pm)

Event Start: 
Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 5:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Spring 2016 Ethnomusicology Colloquium Series Presents: 

Cashinahua Song-Images: Reflections on an Amerindan Relational Aesthetics

Els Lagrou  

(Associate Professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) Graduate Program in Sociology and Anthropology, CNPq (National Council for Scientific and Technological Development) Researcher Coordinator of NAIPE –Center of Amerindian Studies)

April 28, 2016 5:00 pm 
701c Dodge Hall 
Columbia University Center for Ethnomusicology
Free and Open to the Public

Columbia University Morningside Campus

Louise Meintjes (Duke U): "Ululation" (Fri Nov 13, 2015, 4pm)

Event Start: 
Friday, November 13, 2015 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall, Center for Ethnomusicology

The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a talk by:

Prof. Louise Meintjes
(Departments of Anthropology and Music, Duke University)

"Ululation"

Date:  Friday, November 13, 2015
Time: 4:00PM
Location: 701C Dodge Hall, Center for Ethnomusicology. (Columbia University Morningside Campus at 116th St.
(Location Map)

Free and open to the public; reception to follow talk.

Louise Meintjes is Associate Professor of Music and Cultural Anthropology at Duke University and author of Sound of Africa! Making Music Zulu in a South African Studio (Duke UP 2003).  Her new book,  Dust of the Zulu: Ngoma Aesthetics after Apartheid, is forthcoming on Duke University Press in 2016.

Alex E. Chavez (Anthroplogy, Notre Dame) - "Sounds of a Precarious Present, or Post-Mexico in the Offing . . ." (Thursday Nov. 1

Event Start: 
Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall -- The Center for Ethnomusicology (Columbia University Morningside Campus)

The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a talk by:

Prof. Alex E. Chavez
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
University of Notre Dame

"Sounds of a Precarious Present, or Post-Mexico in the Offing . . ."

Date: Thursday, November 12 2015
Time: 4:00PM-6:00PM (reception to follow)
Location:  701C Dodge Hall - The Center for Ethnomusicology (Columbia U. Morningside Campus, at 116th St.)
Free and Open to the Public, No RSVP Required

For further information write to: aaf19@columbia.edu

Abstract: In the post-NAFTA era of intensified transnational migration, state and narco violence carried out with impunity, and calls for indigenous autonomy across Mexico, the growing perception of a waning Mexican state has taken hold in both the local and the global imagination. Dr. Chávez’s talk considers this tensive reality and attends to a grassroots politics of culture with specific focus on the New Years Eve ritual huapango arribeño performance in the highlands of northeastern Guanajuato. There, two ensembles engage in both poetic dueling and musical flyting in the town of Xichú from dusk until dawn while thousands of spectators ring in the New Year.  The ensuing music and poetics that fluoresce, it is argued, animate affective desires of connection and recognition that gesture toward a post-national imagination. In pursuit of this claim, the expressive grammar of huapango arribeño is considered alongside conventional scriptings of Mexican cultural nationalism—which have inscribed huapango as one musical trope of Mexicanidad—and officialized state discourses voiced recently in the face of widespread social unrest across Mexico.

Alex E. Chávez earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Texas at Austin with a concentration in folklore and public culture and also holds doctoral portfolios in both Mexican American Studies and Cultural Studies. Before joining the department, he was a post-doctoral fellow in the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame and at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he served as both a Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Latina/Latino Studies and a Research Associate in the Department of Anthropology. From 2012-2014 he taught in the Latin American and Latino Studies Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago as a Visiting Assistant Professor. Centered around the US-Mexico Borderlands and Latinas/os in the United States, Chavez’s research and teaching interests explore the innermost workings of transnational migration, embodiment, place-making, and everyday life as manifest in political economies of performance with particular emphasis on music and language. His forthcoming book is entitled ¡Huapango!: Mexican Music, Bordered Lives, and the Sounds of Crossing (Duke University Press). In collaboration with Daniel Sheehy—Director and Curator of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings—he is currently lead consultant for a Folkways recording of huapango arribeño for inclusion in the world-renowned Tradiciones music series, lending an anthropological perspective on this music to a broader audience. In a similar capacity, he also serves as co-contributing editor of the Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists column in Anthropology News, helping anthropological research focused on U.S. Latinas/o communities reach a wider public.  He has published in the Latin American Music Review, Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, Southern Cultures, Música Oral del Sur, and has contributed to Celebrating Latino Folklore: An Encyclopedia of Cultural Traditions (2012), Iconic Mexico (2015), Latino, American, Dream (forthcoming, Texas A&M Press), in addition to Con La Música a Otra Parte: Migración e Identidad en La Lírica Queretana (2010) published with the support of the Fondo Nacional para la Cultura y Las Artes in Mexico.

Alex Chavez Curriculum Vitae

Carlos Sandroni - ""Mário de Andrade (1893-1945) and the music of Northeastern Brazil" (Mon. Oct. 26, 4pm)

Event Start: 
Monday, October 26, 2015 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)

The Center for Ethnomusicology Colloquium Series Presents:

Prof. Carlos Sandroni 
(Ethnomusicology, Federal University of Pernambuco [Recife], Brazil) 

"Mário de Andrade (1893-1945) and the music of Northeastern Brazil"

Monday Oct. 26, 2015
4:10PM
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)
Free and Open to the Public

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Carlos Sandroni was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1958.  He studied Sociology and Political Sciences in the university of Rio, and guitar in private lessons. He did a doctorate in Musicology in France, at the Université de Tours. His dissertation (finished in 1997) was in the early history of samba, and it was published in Rio in 2001. The early history of Brazilian popular music (roughly, 1880-1940) remains a field of interest.

Sandroni came back to Brazil in 1997 and since then has taught Ethnomusicology at the Federal University of Pernambuco (Recife). The Brazilian Ethnomusicology Association was founded in 2001 and Sandroni was its first president (2001-2004). In 2004, the Brazilian Ministry of Culture hired him to work on the Brazilian nomination for the Intangible Cultural Heritage list of Unesco, samba-de-roda from Bahia. The nomination was accepted by Unesco. Since then he has developed a second important field of research: the impact of the public policies related to Intangible Cultural Heritage on popular musicians and dancers from Northeastern Brazil.

In 2007,Sandroni was a Tinker Visiting Professor at the University of Texas at Austin. In 2008, he was an Associate Researcher at the Center for Ethnomusicology Research in Paris.

Sandroni published an earlier book, on the Brazilian writer-musicologist Mário de Andrade and his work on public culture (São Paulo, 1988). He also co-edited two other volumes with colleagues: one about the samba de roda from Bahia (Brasília, 2007), and another about the public policies on intangible heritage (Recife, 2014).

He has published two collections of field recordings. One is a double CD on traditional music from Pernambuco and the neighbor state of Paraíba (Recife, 2005), and the other is a single CD on samba de roda music (Salvador, 2006).

As a singer, guitarist, and songwriter, Sandroni published in 2014 the CD "Sem regresso."

His current projects are a collection of articles on the history of Brazilian popular music, and a book on the Intangible Heritage Policies in Brazil.

Workshop with Prof. Georgina Born: "Retheorizing the Social; Rethinking the Genre" (4/1, 4-7pm)

Event Start: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)
The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents a Workshop with:


Prof. Georgina Born (University of Oxford)

"Retheorizing the Social; Rethinking the Genre"

Wednesday, April 1, 2015
4-7pm
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)

Free and open to the public.







click for full-sized poster!















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Film Screening: Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975 (4/2 8pm)

Event Start: 
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 8:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology), Columbia Morningside Campus
The Center for Ethnomusicology's 2015 Ethnographic Film Series invite you to a screening of:

Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975


Thursday, April 2,  8 PM
701C Dodge Hall.
Refreshments to be served.
Free and open to the public!

About the Film: During the rise of The Black Power Movement in the 60s and 70s, Swedish Television journalists documented the unfolding cultural revolution for their audience back home, having been granted unprecedented access to prominent leaders such as Angela Davis, the SNCC's Stokely Carmichael, and Black Panthers founders Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale.  Now, after more than 30 years in storage, this never-before-seen footage spanning nearly a decade of Black Power is finally available. Director Goran Hugo Olsson presents this mixtape, highlighting the key figures and events in the movement, as seen in a light completely different than the narrative of the American media at the time.  Talib Kweli, Erykah Badu, Abiodun Oyewole, John Forte, and Robin Kelley are among the many important voices providing narration and commentary, adding modern perspective to this essential time capsule of African-American history.





















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"BEYONCE: Feminist Discourse in the Visual Album." (Screening and Discussion at IRWaGS, 4/24 5-7pm)

Event Start: 
Friday, April 24, 2015 - 5:00pm
Location: 
754 SCHERMERHORN EXTENSION
The Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality and Barnard College Ethnomusicology Major Jenny Payne present "BEYONCE: Feminist Discourse in the Visual Album."  
A screening of Beyonce's "visual album" will be followed by open discussion.  Please come!
Friday April 24 2015
5PM-7PM
754 SCHERMERHORN EXTENSION

Confirm attendance on Facebook here:
https://www.facebook.com/events/671248579646387/
Facebook event link

Film Screening: Wild Style: Early Hip-Hop in New York (3/12, 8PM, FREE!)

Event Start: 
Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 8:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology, Columbia Morningside Campus @ 116th St.)

The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents . . . 

WILD STYLE: Early Hip-Hop in New York

The inagaugural presentation in the Center's Ethnographic Film Series.

Thursday, March 12
8PM
701C Dodge Hall
(Center for Ethnomusicology, Columbia Morningside Campus, Broadway and 116th St.)

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Refreshments to be served.

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