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Guitarists' Workshop with CYRIL PAHINUI, Oct. 14, 1PM (Free and Open to Public!)

Event Start: 
Sunday, October 14, 2012 - 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 
112 Dodge Hall, Columbia Univ. Morningside Campus (access from College Walk)

The Center for Ethnomusicology Proudly Presents:

A Guitar Workshop with Hawai'ian slack key guitar virtuoso:

CYRIL PAHINUI

In conjunction with his performance on Saturday, Oct. 12 at 8PM in Davis Auditorium, Hawaiian slack key guitar virtuoso Cyril Pahinui will be offering a master class for guitarists at 1PM on Sunday, Oct. 14, in 112 Dodge Hall on the Columbia Morningside campus. 

This master-class is free open to the public and all guitarists are invited.  However, space is limited.  Please contact Prof. Fellezs at kf2362 @ columbia.edu to inquire about reserving a place. If you do not have a reserved place, be sure to arrive promptly at 1PM.

Cyril Pahinui is one of Hawai‘i’s most gifted guitarists and singers. Cyril has performed at Carnegie Hall, contributed to three GRAMMYTM Award-winning albums, received several Hoku Hanohano Awards, and recorded on more than 35 Hawaiian musical releases. As a slack key guitarist, Cyril’s technical virtuosity imparts the soul of Hawaiian music, and his beautiful, emotive, and well-recognized voice renders an intimate picture of his Pacific island home.

112 Dodge is accessed from College Walk.  Enter Columbia's main gate at 116th and Broadway (right opposite the #1 train stop at 116th) and stay to your left as you proceed down College Walk.  You will be walking along the south side of Dodge Hall.  Enter the last door on your left before you reach the end of the building (the handicapped access elevator) and the stairs up to Low Plaza.  A sign will be posted on this door during the event.

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar Legend CYRIL PAHINUI to Perform at Columbia Saturday Oct. 13, 8PM

Event Start: 
Saturday, October 13, 2012 - 8:00pm - 10:00pm
Location: 
Davis Auditorium, CESPR (Schapiro Center) -- see article for map

The Center for Ethnomusicology's "Native Sounds North&South" Series Proudly Presents:

CYRIL PAHINUI

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar Virtuoso and Singer
Making a Rare East Coast Appearance!

Saturday Oct. 13, 2012
8:00PM (note new time!)
Davis Auditorium (CESPR/Schapiro Center, Enter from 120th St. and Broadway)
Click for full sized map of routes to Davis Auditorium, CESPR Schapiro Center


click here for map

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Limited Seating, Please Arrive on Time!


Cyril Pahinui is one of Hawai‘i’s most gifted guitarists and singers. Cyril has performed at Carnegie Hall, contributed to three GRAMMYTM Award-winning albums, received several Hoku Hanohano Awards, and recorded on more than 35 Hawaiian musical releases. As a slack key guitarist, Cyril’s technical virtuosity imparts the soul of Hawaiian music, and his beautiful, emotive, and well-recognized voice renders an intimate picture of his Pacific island home.

Cyril Pahinui Poster




click image for full-sized poster


________________________________________

Associated Symposium:

Pacific Roots Music, Pacific Routes Music: Tracking Marshallese and Hawaiian Music Across the Pacific

Prof. Kevin Fellezs (Columbia University): 
“Listen But Don’t Ask Question”: Ki ho’alu and Listening for the Sounds of Hawaiian-ness 

Jessica Schwartz, PhD (Columbia University):
"Home Sweet Home": Marshallese Musical Reflections on Religion, Human Rights, and Diplomacy in "Free   Association" Diaspora

Discussant: Prof. J. Kehaulani Kauanui
Wesleyan University

Friday October 12, 4-6PM
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)

Pacific roots symposium poster

SYMPOSIUM: Pacific Roots Music, Pacific Routes Music: Tracking Marshallese & Hawaiian Music Across the Pacific - Friday Oct. 12,

Event Start: 
Friday, October 12, 2012 - 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)

In Conjunction with the 2012 "Native Sounds North and South" Concert Series presentation of Hawai'ian Guitar Virtuoso Cyril Pahinui on Oct. 13, 2012, The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University Presents a Symposium on Friday Oct. 12, 2012:

Pacific Roots Music, Pacific Routes Music: Tracking Marshallese and Hawaiian Music Across the Pacific

Friday October 12, 4-6PM
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)
Free and Open to the Public

Prof. Kevin FellezsProf. Kevin Fellezs
“Listen But Don’t Ask Question”: Ki ho’alu and Listening for the Sounds of Hawaiian-ness
Kevin Fellezs is Assistant Professor of Music and African-American Studies at Columbia University.


Jessicca Schwartz, Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Music, Columbia University Jessica Schwartz, PhD
"Home Sweet Home": Marshallese Musical Reflections on Religion, Human Rights,&Diplomacy in "Free   Association" Diaspora

Jessica Schwartz is a Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Music at Columbia University.


Prof. Kehaulani Kauhanui, Wesleyan University

Discussant: Prof. J. Kehaulani Kauanui
Wesleyan University

J. Kehaulani Kauanui is Associate Professor of Anthropology and American Studies at Wesleyan University.


_____________________________

Pacific roots symposium poster

John-Carlos Perea and AKU-MATU to Perform at Columbia on Sept. 22 (Native Sounds North and South)

Event Start: 
Saturday, September 22, 2012 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Davis Auditorium, Schapiro Hall, NW corner of Columbia University Morningside Campus
The Center for Ethnomusicology's "Native Sounds North&South" Series presents concert of Jazz and Hip-Hop by Native American/Native Alaskan recording artists:

JOHN-CARLOS PEREA
and Elliot Humberto Kavee

and

AKU-MATU


Saturday September 22, 2012
Davis Auditorium, Schapiro Center (click for map)
Columbia University Morningside Campus
7PM-10PM
Free and Open to the Public

(see below for associated class and symposium)

FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE (let us know you're coming!)
CONCERT PROGRAM (PDF)
PHOTO CREDIT: Stephen Butler, Canyon Records, 2011 JOHN-CARLOS PEREA and
ELLIOT HUMBERTO KAVEE


Click thumbnail for full-sized image
PHOTO CREDIT: Stephen Butler, Canyon Records, 2011

_____________________________

AKU-MATU (ALLISON WARDEN) credit: selfAKU-MATU (Allison Warden)
Iñupiaq performance artist.


Click thumbnail for full-sized image




About the artists:

John-Carlos Perea (Mescalero Apache, Irish, German, Chicano) has maintained an active career as a performer and recording artist in San Francisco’s Jazz and World music scenes since 1997. First Dance, his debut recording as a leader, featured John-Carlos’ original musical compositions and performances on electric bass, cedar flute, and pow-wow singing. 

John-Carlos has recorded on over a dozen albums as a sideman and, in 2007, he won a GRAMMY® (Best New Age Album [Vocal or Instrumental]) as a member of the Paul Winter Consort for pow-wow and cedar flute songs contributed to "Crestone" (http://tinyurl.com/7dn58vj). His most recent release is "Waking from the Roots" by Coyote Jump, a new collaborative ensemble featuring John-Carlos on cedar flute with composer Colin Farish, available from Canyon Records (http://tinyurl.com/7u2rntk).

John-Carlos is also Assistant Professor in the Department of American Indian Studies, College of Ethnic Studies, at San Francisco State University. He received his BA (2000) in Music from San Francisco State University and his MA and Ph.D. (2005/2009) in Music from the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include contemporary urban American Indian musical cultures, pow-wow music and dance, New Age music, and the music of saxophonist Jim Pepper. John-Carlos is presently authoring “Intertribal Native American Music in the United States,” a textbook and CD package under contract to Oxford University Press.

________

Allison Warden (AKU-MATU) is an Iñupiaq Eskimo Inter-Disciplinary Artist with a passion for the self-determination of Indigenous Peoples.  She raps under the name AKU-MATU and loves working with young people, empowering them through the use of theatre and music. She creates her own beats for her rhymes, sampling traditional sounds and inserting her Iñupiaq language into her songs.  She lives in Anchorage, Alaska and has close ties to her home community of Kaktovik, Alaska. 

Her one-woman show, “Ode to the Polar Bear” has toured extensively across Alaska and the lower-48 and has been re-worked into a completely new and longer piece, titled “Calling All Polar Bears” which debuted at Intermedia Arts with Pangea Theatre in Minneapolis, Minnesota in November 2011.  She acted in Andrew MacLean’s film, “On the Ice” that premiered at Sundance in 2011.  In 2009, she was part of the “virtual subsistence” exhibition at MTS Gallery and coordinated over 25 people to participate in a performance which focused on the incident with the Point Hope caribou and land use issues.   Allison was the MC for the Elders and Youth Convention at the Alaska Federation of Natives Conference in October of 2010 and 2011 and was active in presenting about language revitalization. 

Allison is an engaged community member, passionate about awakening Indigenous youth to their potential and voice.  She is most excited about working on her AKU-MATU album and about expressing herself through writing more poetry, plays and a screenplay.  She can be reached through her website, www.aku-matu.com


RELATED EVENTS:
Thursday Sept. 20

Dodge  Hall 622
Jessica Bissett Perea, John-Carlos Perea, Allison Warden, and Lauren Amsterdam visit "Music in Contemporary Native America," 6:10-7:25
This is open to non-members of the class, but please RSVP to aaf19@columbia.edu for permission to attend, by Wed. Sept. 18.

Friday Sept. 21
701C Dodge Hall  (Center for Ethnomusicology)
2-4:30PM

Symposium: Indigenous Music Today
Dr. Jessica Bissett Perea Jessica Bissett-Perea, PhD
(Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow, Dept. of Music, Univ. of California, Berkeley)
Jessica Bissett Perea
(click thumbnail for full-sized image)

“Sounding Traditions of Inuit Cosmopolitanism in ‘Flying Wild Alaska’”
This paper explores circuits of Inuit cosmopolitanism as represented through the soundscapes and imagery of the Discovery Channel’s documentary-style reality television series “Flying Wild Alaska,” (2011-2012). When compared to its counterparts (e.g. “Deadliest Catch,” “Ice Road Truckers,” and “Gold Rush: Alaska”), “Flying Wild Alaska” is notable for portraying the diversity and mobility of Alaska Native and Inuit cultures, in part through the show’s use of contemporary Inuit music as a backdrop to portrayals of modern life in the arctic. From professionalized traditional drumsongs to funk- and jazz-influenced “Inuit World Music,” my musicocultural analysis will illuminate the longer history of Inuit cosmopolitanism throughout the circumpolar region and make audible the literal and figurative histories of Native migration between rural and urban spaces.

Lauren AmsterdamLauren J. Amsterdam
(MA, African-American Studies, Columbia University)
"All the Eagles and the Ravens in the House Say Yeah! (Ab)Original Hip Hop Artists and Styles of Heritage" 


Young people across Native North America and the First Nations are making beats, spitting rhymes, telling stories, and taking direct action to build the future now. Hip hop artists are reppin’ a radicalized (ab)original heritage that is “everywhere,” but most of all, in hip hop, challenging the limitations of poverty, invisibility, and social dislocation. Confronting the symptoms of invasion—racism, poverty, police violence, inter-generational trauma, and “haters”—artists profoundly demonstrate that the materiality of hip hop is a way of not dying, and of moving past the necessity of surviving to a fuller, thriving political and cultural life. While artists are indeed inheriting loss, they choose to move with loss, not past it, being playful and political with real and imagined memories. Rather than mourn who they would or could have been if the past was different, artists orient themselves towards the potentiality of the future through self-love and communal care, shedding the settler nation's inculcation of shame and alienation.
______________

Discussants:
AKU-MATU (Allison Warden), Prof. John-Carlos Perea


COMING UP OCT. 13: MASTER OF HAWAI'IAN SLACK KEY GUITAR CYRIL PAHINUI, 7PM IN DAVIS AUDITORIUM, SAT 10/13/12


Middle Eastern Music Ensemble Spring Concert (Sunday 4/29, 2pm, RSVP required)

Event Start: 
Sunday, April 29, 2012 - 2:00pm
Location: 
Lerner Hall Party Space (114th & B'way, basement level)

Columbia Middle Eastern Music Ensemble Spring Concert
Sunday, April 29, 2012
2 PM
Lerner Party Space
FREE!  (BUT RSVP for attendees without CU ID, please see below**)
Performing Turkish, Arabic, Yemeni Jewish, Armenian, Kurdish, Greek, Ladino, Gilaki, and Persian folk and art music

The CMEME is made up of Columbia and Barnard undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and staff

**RSVP Required for Non-CUID**
For more information contact
hemmasi@gmail.com
or
ozanaksoy@gmail.com

Download full-sized poster!  (PDF)

Anthony Seeger: Is it Possible to Safeguard Intangible Cultural Heritage, and If it Is, Should We Try? (April 5th, 12 noon)

Event Start: 
Thursday, April 5, 2012 - 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall, Center for Ethnomusicology, Columbia University, 2960 Broadway

The 2012 Ethnomusicology Colloquium presents:

Is it Possible to Safeguard Intangible Cultural Heritage, and If it Is, Should We Try?

A Talk by Prof. Anthony Seeger

Thursday, April, 5, 2012
12:00 pm

The Center for Ethnomusicology
Dodge Hall 701 C
Department of Music
Columbia University

Few musical traditions simply "disappear." Most are actively "disappeared" by intolerance, laws, bureaucratic action/inaction, and changing economic and social processes. Should scholars do anything about this? In 2006, enough member nations had ratified the UNESCO International Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage to enable it to enter into force. This presentation is based on the author's experience with the earlier UNESCO program of the Proclamation of Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity when he served as Secretary General of the International Council for Traditional Music. He will also draw on his own field research as well as discussions of the effectiveness of cultural policies implemented following a given musical form to be a Masterpiece in order to address whether it is possible to safeguard intangible cultural heritage, and if it is, whether we should try.

Anthony Seeger is Distinguished Professor, Ethnomusicology and Director, Ethnomusicology Archive, The University of California at Los Angeles.  He is the author of Why Suyá Sing: A Musical Anthropology of an Amazonian People, Cambridge University Press, 1987 and co-editor of Early Field Recordings: A Catalogue of the Cylinder Collections at the Indiana University Archives of Traditional Music (Indiana University Press, 1987). His numerous published articles have focused on issues of land and human rights for Brazilian Indians, issues of archiving and intellectual property, and ethnomusicological theory and method.  Seeger served as Director of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings at the Smithsonian Institute from 1988 to 2000. He served as Director of the Archives of Traditional Music at Indiana University and as a professor in the Department of Anthropology from 1982 to 1988. He was a researcher and professor in the Department of Anthropology at the Museu Nacional in Rio de Janeiro from 1975 to 1982. Seeger was Executive Producer of all recordings issued on the Smithsonian Folkways label between 1988 and 2000, a total of about 250 recordings.

Click here to visit his bio page at UCLA, or here to view his curriculum vitae.

Glories of the Japanese Musical Heritage: Japanese Sacred Gagaku Court Music and Secular Art Music: Ancient Soundscapes Reborn

Event Start: 
Friday, March 30, 2012 - 8:00pm
Location: 
Miller Theater of Columbia University, 116th St. and Broadway
Glories of the Japanese Musical Heritage
“Japanese Sacred Gagaku Court Music and Secular Art Music: Ancient Soundscapes Reborn”


March 30, 2012

8PM
Miller Theater (116th and Broadway)
Free and Open to the Public

For more information, contact the Institute for Medieval Japanese Studies at IMJSevent@gmail.com.

Featuring the renowned Japanese Gagaku musicians Hitomi Nakamura (hichiriki), Mayumi Miyata (sho), and Takeshi Sasamoto (ryuteki).

With the Columbia Gagaku Instrumental Ensemble of New York, New York-based Hogaku artists Masayo Ishigure (shamisen), Elizabeth Brown (shakuhachi), and the Momenta Quartet

Gagaku, our planet's oldest living orchestral music, is experiencing a nationwide renaissance among young Japanese. Treasured as sacred, and protected by the Imperial Japanese Court for more than 1,000 years, it experienced a hiatus during Japan's recent century-long obsession with European music. Nonetheless, Gagaku has now emerged and unfolded its wings at the hands of 21st century composers and artists who, revering its celestial sounds, are pioneering new music for these magnificent instruments.
_________________
Presented by the Institute for Medieval Japanese Studies and the Columbia Music Performance Program
Supported by the Consulate General of Japan in New York

Angel Quintero Rivera - "World Visions of Diversity" (March 5)

Event Start: 
Monday, March 5, 2012 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall *(Center for Ethnomusicology)

The Spring 2012 Ethnomusicology Colloquium presents:
World Visions of Diversity Within Musical Afro Aesthetical Practices in Caribbean
Latin America


Angel Quintero Rivera

Monday, March, 5, 2012 4:00pm
Center for Ethnomusicology
Dodge Hall 701 C
Department of Music
Columbia University
Free and open to the public

This presentation analyzes the cultural and socio-historical significance of diverse de- centered aesthetical elaboration practices within the musical tradition of Afro Latin America. It tries to establish continuities within the transformations experienced in these aesthetical practices from ancient traditional genres to contemporary forms of expression.

"SIMULATIONS IN MUSIC" - An Open Lecture by Manuel De Landa(Feb 9, 6pm)

Event Start: 
Thursday, February 9, 2012 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Location: 
Schapiro Center, Davis Auditorium, Columbia Morningside Campus

The Center for Ethnomusicology and The Computer Music Center at Columbia University jointly present:

"SIMULATIONS IN MUSIC" -- AN OPEN LECTURE BY MANUEL DE LANDA
Thursday, February 9th, 2012
6:00 - 8:00 PM
Davis Auditorium, Schapiro Center
Columbia University
Free and Open to the Public
Map showing Schapiro Center:
http://www.columbia.edu/about_columbia/map/schapiro_center.html

Manuel De Landa (b. in Mexico City, 1952), based in New York since
1975, is a philosopher, media artist, programmer and software
designer. After studying art in the 1970s, he became known as an
independent filmmaker making underground 8mm and 16mm films inspired
by critical theory and philosophy. In the 1980s, Manuel De Landa
focused on programing, writing computer software, and computer art.
After being introduced to the work of Gilles Deleuze, he saw new
creative potential in philosophical texts, becoming one of the
representatives of the 'new materialism'.

Manuel De Landa is Adjunct Professor at University of Pennsylvania in
Philadelphia and the Gilles Deleuze Chair of Contemporary Philosophy
and Science at the European Graduate School EGS, he was Adjunct
Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning
and Preservation at Columbia University (New York). He currently
lectures extensively in the United States and Europe, and is lecturer
at the Canisius College (Buffalo, NY) and at the University of
Philadelphia. Manuel De Landa's essays are published in numerous
journals, and he is the author of War in the Age of Intelligent
Machines (1991), A Thousand Years of Nonlinear History (1997),
Intensive Science and Virtual Philosophy (2002), and A New Philosophy
of Society: Assemblage Theory and Social Complexity (2006).

Event Contact: 
Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa (ao2110@columbia.edu)
Event Sponsors: 
The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University
The Computer Music Center at Columbia University

Colloquium: "Kika Kila: Hawaiian Guitars and Steel Bars in the Era of the Overthrow" - John W. Troutman

Event Start: 
Thursday, February 2, 2012 - 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall, Center for Ethnomusicology

The Center for Ethnomusicology Spring Colloquium Series Presents:

Kika Kila: Hawaiian Guitars and Steel Bars in the Era of the Overthrow
a talk by John W. Troutman
(Assistant Prof. of U.S., Cultural, Public,&American Indian History,  Univ. of Louisiana, Lafayette)
Thursday, February 2, 2012
12:00 – 2:00 pm
Center for Ethnomusicology
Dodge Hall 701 C

Free and open to the public.

Soon after the illegal overthrow of Queen Lili'oukalani's government and U.S. annexation of Hawaii in 1898, Joe Kekuku and other Native Hawaiian guitarists embarked upon a series of transcontinental journeys that continue to ripple and resonate. This presentation will explore the origins of the Hawaiian (steel) guitar and situate its development within both the proliferation of a rich guitar culture in the islands, and within the accompanying political turmoil that led to and followed the overthrow of Ka?naka Maoli rule in the Hawaiian islands.
____

John W. Troutman is Assistant Profesor of History, University of Louisiana, Lafayette. He received his master’s degree in American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona, and his doctorate in history from the University of Texas at Austin. His research and teaching interests include multiple facets of American Indian history as well as studies of race, culture, and music in the United States in the twentieth century. Before his appointment as assistant professor at UL Lafayette, he was the 2006-2007 Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Wesleyan University’s Center for the Americas in Middletown, Connecticut. Prior to that, he served as Assistant Director of the Newberry Library’s D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History in Chicago. His first book, Indian Blues: American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1890-1934, was published in the spring of 2009 by the University of Oklahoma Press. He has published articles and book reviews in numerous journals, including Ethnohistory, Western Historical Quarterly, Louisiana History Journal and Museum Anthropology, and his essays are featured in a number of edited volumes and other works.

Event Contact: 
Center for Ethnomusicology Director (ao2110@columbia.edu)
Event Sponsors: 
The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University
Free and open to the public
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