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Prof. John Troutman: "Steel Bars and Hawaiian Guitars" - Friday Nov. 4, 2016, 4PM

Event Start: 
Friday, November 4, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Center for Ethnomusicology is please to present a colloquium presentation by:

Prof. John W. Troutman

(History and Geography, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, author of Indian Blues and the new Kika Kila)

speaking on:
"Steel Bars and Hawaiian Guitars: (Re)Centering Indigenous Technology and Musical Practice within the Origins of the Modern Music Industry."

Friday November 4, 2016
4:00PM to 6:00PM 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)
Reception to follow talk
Information: aaf19@columbia.edu

Free and open to the public!

The Hawaiian steel guitar profoundly altered the early twentieth-century sounds of the modern music industry. However, few scholars have acknowledged the instrument's role in shaping the soundtrack of modernity, let alone its indigenous origins.  In this talk, John Troutman will draw from his new book, Kīkā Kila: How the Hawaiian Steel Guitar Changed the Sound of Modern Music, in order to contemplate the efforts of Hawaiians to develop a new instrument within the context of intense colonial upheaval, and their impact along regional theater circuits and on New York City stages in the years that followed.

Interested members of the public are also invited to attend Prof. Fox's class "Music in Contemporary Native America" on Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, from 6-7:30pm, to hear Prof. Troutman discuss his important first book, Indian Blues. Please defer to students in the class during discussion if you attend. 


John Troutman is Associate Professor of History at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He received his doctorate in history from the University of Texas at Austin and his master’s degree in American Indian Studies from the University of Arizona. He has received multiple fellowships and grants from the Smithsonian Institution, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. His research agenda focuses on the historical significance of music in American life, particularly in the lives of indigenous peoples. His first book, Indian Blues: American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1879-1934, was favorably reviewed in journals that span the disciplines of American Studies, History, Musicology, Anthropology, Folklore, and American Indian Studies; among other accolades it won the Western History Association’s biennial W. Turrentine Jackson Award for a "first book on any aspect of the American West.” In May of this year, the University of North Carolina Press published his second monograph, Kīkā Kila: How the Hawaiian Steel Guitar Changed the Sound of Modern Music. The book chronicles the history of the Hawaiian steel guitar, from the cultural and political context that produced it in the Islands in the 1880s, to its role in shaping the sounds of modern music in North America and throughout the world.

______________________

Dr. Robin Gray (UC Santa Cruz) -- "Repatriation and Decolonization: Thoughts on Ownership, Access, and Control" (Friday Sept. 30

Event Start: 
Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)
The Center for Ethnomusicology is pleased to welcome:
Dr. Robin R. R. Gray (Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow in History, University of California, Santa Cruz)

speaking on:  "Repatriation and Decolonization: Thoughts on Ownership, Access, and Control."

Friday, Sept. 30, 2016
4PM-6PM (reception to follow)
701C Dodge Hall
Free and Open to the Public

_____________
Members of the public are also invited to join Dr. Gray for a session of Prof. Aaron Fox's class "Music in Contemporary Native America" on:

Thursday, Sept. 29, 6PM-7:30PM, 701C Dodge Hall


This presentation is based on an assigned reading from Dr. Gray's PhD dissertation: "Ts'msyen Revolution" Chaps 1-4.

Bio: Dr. Robin Gray (Ts’msyen) holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology (2015), and a Graduate Certificate in Indigenous Studies (2015) from the University of Massachusetts.  She is currently a President’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her work engages in multi-sited, community-based research projects involving the international repatriation of Ts’msyen songs from archives, and embodied heritage reclamation in an urban Ts’msyen dance group. She is also developing a comprehensive knowledge dissemination strategy based on the topic, Researching, Representing and Repatriating Ts’msyen Cultural Heritage.  

Dr. Gray's website can be viewed at:   
http://www.robingray.ca

For more information contact Aaron Fox at aaf19@columbia.edu

Els Lagrou -- Cashinahua Song-Images: Reflections on an Amerindan Relational Aesthetics (Thurs April 28, 5pm)

Event Start: 
Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 5:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Spring 2016 Ethnomusicology Colloquium Series Presents: 

Cashinahua Song-Images: Reflections on an Amerindan Relational Aesthetics

Els Lagrou  

(Associate Professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) Graduate Program in Sociology and Anthropology, CNPq (National Council for Scientific and Technological Development) Researcher Coordinator of NAIPE –Center of Amerindian Studies)

April 28, 2016 5:00 pm 
701c Dodge Hall 
Columbia University Center for Ethnomusicology
Free and Open to the Public

Columbia University Morningside Campus

Indigeneity and Music: talks by Amanda Minks & Deise Lucy Montardo (Sept. 18, 12-2)

Event Start: 
Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall, Center for Ethnomusicology, Columbia University Morningside Campus, 116th St. and Broadway
The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a colloquium on:

Indigeneity and Music

featured speakers:

Amanda Minks (University of Oklahoma):
"Constructing Culture and Indigeneity on the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua"

Deise Lucy Montardo (Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Brazil; President. Brazilian Ethnomusicology Association [ABET]):
Music and Cosmology in Lowland South America: Guarani and Baniwa cases

Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014
12 noon - 2pm
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)
Columbia University Morningside Campus (B'way and 116th St.)

Free and Open to the Public

___________________

Amanda Minks is Associate Professor in the Honors College and is affiliated with the Department of Anthropology and with the programs in Native American Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies at OU.  She earned a Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology at Columbia University in 2006, with research specializations in music-language relations and language socialization.  Her courses focus on music, language, and cultural politics in the Americas.  She also teaches a course with a global focus on intellectual property and cultural heritage.

Dr. Minks has conducted ethnographic research on the Atlantic coast of Nicaragua for over ten years.  She has examined the aesthetics and politics of play among Miskitu children living on Corn Island in her monograph Voices of Play: Miskitu Children's Speech and Song on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua (University of Arizona Press, 2013).  She has also written about Miskitu music and community media in Bilwi, in the northern autonomous region of the Atlantic coast.  Most recently, she has been studying inter-American cultural policies of the mid-20th century and their impact on discourses of development in the U.S. and in Latin America.

Dr. Minks has received grants and fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the Fulbright Institute of International Education, among others.  Her past publications include articles in the journals Pragmatics, Language and Communication, Ethnomusicology, Yearbook for Traditional Music, and Wani, as well as chapters in several edited volumes.

_______________  read more »

Center Repatriation Projects Featured in Columbia News and Soundcheck Stories

The Center for Ethnomusicology's projects to "repatriate" recordings of collector Laura Boulton,  conducted in collaboration with Native American and Alaska Native communities, are featured in a story in Columbia News, and in a video feature on the Columbia University home page.
 read more »

SYMPOSIUM: Pacific Roots Music, Pacific Routes Music: Tracking Marshallese & Hawaiian Music Across the Pacific - Friday Oct. 12,

Event Start: 
Friday, October 12, 2012 - 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)

In Conjunction with the 2012 "Native Sounds North and South" Concert Series presentation of Hawai'ian Guitar Virtuoso Cyril Pahinui on Oct. 13, 2012, The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University Presents a Symposium on Friday Oct. 12, 2012:

Pacific Roots Music, Pacific Routes Music: Tracking Marshallese and Hawaiian Music Across the Pacific

Friday October 12, 4-6PM
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)
Free and Open to the Public

Prof. Kevin FellezsProf. Kevin Fellezs
“Listen But Don’t Ask Question”: Ki ho’alu and Listening for the Sounds of Hawaiian-ness
Kevin Fellezs is Assistant Professor of Music and African-American Studies at Columbia University.


Jessicca Schwartz, Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Music, Columbia University Jessica Schwartz, PhD
"Home Sweet Home": Marshallese Musical Reflections on Religion, Human Rights,&Diplomacy in "Free   Association" Diaspora

Jessica Schwartz is a Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Music at Columbia University.


Prof. Kehaulani Kauhanui, Wesleyan University

Discussant: Prof. J. Kehaulani Kauanui
Wesleyan University

J. Kehaulani Kauanui is Associate Professor of Anthropology and American Studies at Wesleyan University.


_____________________________

Pacific roots symposium poster

Native Music Today Symposium: Dr. Jessica Bissett-Perea and Lauren Amsterdam (Friday Sept. 21, 4PM)

Event Start: 
Friday, September 21, 2012 - 2:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall -- Center for Ethnomusicology

In association with "Native Sounds North and South" concert on Sept. 22 (Saturday), The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a symposium:

Indigenous Music Today: Inuit Cosmopolitanism and Native American Hip-Hop with Dr. Jessica Bissett-Perea and Lauren Amsterdam

Friday Sept. 21
2-4:30PM
701C Dodge Hall  (Center for Ethnomusicology)
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Reception to Follow

Dr. Jessica Bissett Perea
Jessica Bissett-Perea, PhD
(Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow, Dept. of Music, Univ. of California, Berkeley, PhD in Musicology, UCLA, 2011)

“Sounding Traditions of Inuit Cosmopolitanism in ‘Flying Wild Alaska’”
This paper explores circuits of Inuit cosmopolitanism as represented through the soundscapes and imagery of the Discovery Channel’s documentary-style reality television series “Flying Wild Alaska,” (2011-2012). When compared to its counterparts (e.g. “Deadliest Catch,” “Ice Road Truckers,” and “Gold Rush: Alaska”), “Flying Wild Alaska” is notable for portraying the diversity and mobility of Alaska Native and Inuit cultures, in part through the show’s use of contemporary Inuit music as a backdrop to portrayals of modern life in the arctic. From professionalized traditional drumsongs to funk- and jazz-influenced “Inuit World Music,” my musicocultural analysis will illuminate the longer history of Inuit cosmopolitanism throughout the circumpolar region and make audible the literal and figurative histories of Native migration between rural and urban spaces.
_________________________
Lauren Amsterdam

Lauren J. Amsterdam
(MA, African-American Studies, Columbia University)


"All the Eagles and the Ravens in the House Say Yeah! (Ab)Original Hip Hop Artists and Styles of Heritage"

Young people across Native North America and the First Nations are making beats, spitting rhymes, telling stories, and taking direct action to build the future now. Hip hop artists are reppin’ a radicalized (ab)original heritage that is “everywhere,” but most of all, in hip hop, challenging the limitations of poverty, invisibility, and social dislocation. Confronting the symptoms of invasion—racism, poverty, police violence, inter-generational trauma, and “haters”—artists profoundly demonstrate that the materiality of hip hop is a way of not dying, and of moving past the necessity of surviving to a fuller, thriving political and cultural life. While artists are indeed inheriting loss, they choose to move with loss, not past it, being playful and political with real and imagined memories. Rather than mourn who they would or could have been if the past was different, artists orient themselves towards the potentiality of the future through self-love and communal care, shedding the settler nation's inculcation of shame and alienation.

______________

Discussants: AKU-MATU (Allison Warden), Prof. John-Carlos Perea.


COMING UP OCT. 13: MASTER OF HAWAI'IAN SLACK KEY GUITAR CYRIL PAHINUI, 7PM IN DAVIS AUDITORIUM, SAT 10/13/12

John-Carlos Perea and AKU-MATU to Perform at Columbia on Sept. 22 (Native Sounds North and South)

Event Start: 
Saturday, September 22, 2012 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Davis Auditorium, Schapiro Hall, NW corner of Columbia University Morningside Campus
The Center for Ethnomusicology's "Native Sounds North&South" Series presents concert of Jazz and Hip-Hop by Native American/Native Alaskan recording artists:

JOHN-CARLOS PEREA
and Elliot Humberto Kavee

and

AKU-MATU


Saturday September 22, 2012
Davis Auditorium, Schapiro Center (click for map)
Columbia University Morningside Campus
7PM-10PM
Free and Open to the Public

(see below for associated class and symposium)

FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE (let us know you're coming!)
CONCERT PROGRAM (PDF)
PHOTO CREDIT: Stephen Butler, Canyon Records, 2011 JOHN-CARLOS PEREA and
ELLIOT HUMBERTO KAVEE


Click thumbnail for full-sized image
PHOTO CREDIT: Stephen Butler, Canyon Records, 2011

_____________________________

AKU-MATU (ALLISON WARDEN) credit: selfAKU-MATU (Allison Warden)
Iñupiaq performance artist.


Click thumbnail for full-sized image




About the artists:

John-Carlos Perea (Mescalero Apache, Irish, German, Chicano) has maintained an active career as a performer and recording artist in San Francisco’s Jazz and World music scenes since 1997. First Dance, his debut recording as a leader, featured John-Carlos’ original musical compositions and performances on electric bass, cedar flute, and pow-wow singing. 

John-Carlos has recorded on over a dozen albums as a sideman and, in 2007, he won a GRAMMY® (Best New Age Album [Vocal or Instrumental]) as a member of the Paul Winter Consort for pow-wow and cedar flute songs contributed to "Crestone" (http://tinyurl.com/7dn58vj). His most recent release is "Waking from the Roots" by Coyote Jump, a new collaborative ensemble featuring John-Carlos on cedar flute with composer Colin Farish, available from Canyon Records (http://tinyurl.com/7u2rntk).

John-Carlos is also Assistant Professor in the Department of American Indian Studies, College of Ethnic Studies, at San Francisco State University. He received his BA (2000) in Music from San Francisco State University and his MA and Ph.D. (2005/2009) in Music from the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include contemporary urban American Indian musical cultures, pow-wow music and dance, New Age music, and the music of saxophonist Jim Pepper. John-Carlos is presently authoring “Intertribal Native American Music in the United States,” a textbook and CD package under contract to Oxford University Press.

________

Allison Warden (AKU-MATU) is an Iñupiaq Eskimo Inter-Disciplinary Artist with a passion for the self-determination of Indigenous Peoples.  She raps under the name AKU-MATU and loves working with young people, empowering them through the use of theatre and music. She creates her own beats for her rhymes, sampling traditional sounds and inserting her Iñupiaq language into her songs.  She lives in Anchorage, Alaska and has close ties to her home community of Kaktovik, Alaska. 

Her one-woman show, “Ode to the Polar Bear” has toured extensively across Alaska and the lower-48 and has been re-worked into a completely new and longer piece, titled “Calling All Polar Bears” which debuted at Intermedia Arts with Pangea Theatre in Minneapolis, Minnesota in November 2011.  She acted in Andrew MacLean’s film, “On the Ice” that premiered at Sundance in 2011.  In 2009, she was part of the “virtual subsistence” exhibition at MTS Gallery and coordinated over 25 people to participate in a performance which focused on the incident with the Point Hope caribou and land use issues.   Allison was the MC for the Elders and Youth Convention at the Alaska Federation of Natives Conference in October of 2010 and 2011 and was active in presenting about language revitalization. 

Allison is an engaged community member, passionate about awakening Indigenous youth to their potential and voice.  She is most excited about working on her AKU-MATU album and about expressing herself through writing more poetry, plays and a screenplay.  She can be reached through her website, www.aku-matu.com


RELATED EVENTS:
Thursday Sept. 20

Dodge  Hall 622
Jessica Bissett Perea, John-Carlos Perea, Allison Warden, and Lauren Amsterdam visit "Music in Contemporary Native America," 6:10-7:25
This is open to non-members of the class, but please RSVP to aaf19@columbia.edu for permission to attend, by Wed. Sept. 18.

Friday Sept. 21
701C Dodge Hall  (Center for Ethnomusicology)
2-4:30PM

Symposium: Indigenous Music Today
Dr. Jessica Bissett Perea Jessica Bissett-Perea, PhD
(Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow, Dept. of Music, Univ. of California, Berkeley)
Jessica Bissett Perea
(click thumbnail for full-sized image)

“Sounding Traditions of Inuit Cosmopolitanism in ‘Flying Wild Alaska’”
This paper explores circuits of Inuit cosmopolitanism as represented through the soundscapes and imagery of the Discovery Channel’s documentary-style reality television series “Flying Wild Alaska,” (2011-2012). When compared to its counterparts (e.g. “Deadliest Catch,” “Ice Road Truckers,” and “Gold Rush: Alaska”), “Flying Wild Alaska” is notable for portraying the diversity and mobility of Alaska Native and Inuit cultures, in part through the show’s use of contemporary Inuit music as a backdrop to portrayals of modern life in the arctic. From professionalized traditional drumsongs to funk- and jazz-influenced “Inuit World Music,” my musicocultural analysis will illuminate the longer history of Inuit cosmopolitanism throughout the circumpolar region and make audible the literal and figurative histories of Native migration between rural and urban spaces.

Lauren AmsterdamLauren J. Amsterdam
(MA, African-American Studies, Columbia University)
"All the Eagles and the Ravens in the House Say Yeah! (Ab)Original Hip Hop Artists and Styles of Heritage" 


Young people across Native North America and the First Nations are making beats, spitting rhymes, telling stories, and taking direct action to build the future now. Hip hop artists are reppin’ a radicalized (ab)original heritage that is “everywhere,” but most of all, in hip hop, challenging the limitations of poverty, invisibility, and social dislocation. Confronting the symptoms of invasion—racism, poverty, police violence, inter-generational trauma, and “haters”—artists profoundly demonstrate that the materiality of hip hop is a way of not dying, and of moving past the necessity of surviving to a fuller, thriving political and cultural life. While artists are indeed inheriting loss, they choose to move with loss, not past it, being playful and political with real and imagined memories. Rather than mourn who they would or could have been if the past was different, artists orient themselves towards the potentiality of the future through self-love and communal care, shedding the settler nation's inculcation of shame and alienation.
______________

Discussants:
AKU-MATU (Allison Warden), Prof. John-Carlos Perea


COMING UP OCT. 13: MASTER OF HAWAI'IAN SLACK KEY GUITAR CYRIL PAHINUI, 7PM IN DAVIS AUDITORIUM, SAT 10/13/12


Colloquium: "Kika Kila: Hawaiian Guitars and Steel Bars in the Era of the Overthrow" - John W. Troutman

Event Start: 
Thursday, February 2, 2012 - 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall, Center for Ethnomusicology

The Center for Ethnomusicology Spring Colloquium Series Presents:

Kika Kila: Hawaiian Guitars and Steel Bars in the Era of the Overthrow
a talk by John W. Troutman
(Assistant Prof. of U.S., Cultural, Public,&American Indian History,  Univ. of Louisiana, Lafayette)
Thursday, February 2, 2012
12:00 – 2:00 pm
Center for Ethnomusicology
Dodge Hall 701 C

Free and open to the public.

Soon after the illegal overthrow of Queen Lili'oukalani's government and U.S. annexation of Hawaii in 1898, Joe Kekuku and other Native Hawaiian guitarists embarked upon a series of transcontinental journeys that continue to ripple and resonate. This presentation will explore the origins of the Hawaiian (steel) guitar and situate its development within both the proliferation of a rich guitar culture in the islands, and within the accompanying political turmoil that led to and followed the overthrow of Ka?naka Maoli rule in the Hawaiian islands.
____

John W. Troutman is Assistant Profesor of History, University of Louisiana, Lafayette. He received his master’s degree in American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona, and his doctorate in history from the University of Texas at Austin. His research and teaching interests include multiple facets of American Indian history as well as studies of race, culture, and music in the United States in the twentieth century. Before his appointment as assistant professor at UL Lafayette, he was the 2006-2007 Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Wesleyan University’s Center for the Americas in Middletown, Connecticut. Prior to that, he served as Assistant Director of the Newberry Library’s D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History in Chicago. His first book, Indian Blues: American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1890-1934, was published in the spring of 2009 by the University of Oklahoma Press. He has published articles and book reviews in numerous journals, including Ethnohistory, Western Historical Quarterly, Louisiana History Journal and Museum Anthropology, and his essays are featured in a number of edited volumes and other works.

Event Contact: 
Center for Ethnomusicology Director (ao2110@columbia.edu)
Event Sponsors: 
The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University
Free and open to the public

Conference Announcement: Music and Indigeneity in the Americas

Event Start: 
Friday, October 1, 2010 - 9:00am - Saturday, October 2, 2010 - 5:00pm
Location: 
414 Sindeband East (Schapiro Center, NE Corner of Campus)

PLEASE NOTE RECENT CHANGES TO SCHEDULE AND LOCATIONS 9/27/10

The Center for Ethnomusicology is pleased to announce our upcoming conference entitled Music and Indigeneity in the Americas. Featuring scholars, activists, and artists from North and South America, the conference will present panels on topics ranging from repatriation and indigenous cultural rights, to law, media, and education, to new forms of collaborative research on popular and traditional music in the context of community-based cultural activism.

The conference will also feature a concert entitled "Native Sounds: North and South" featuring Native Alaskan Hip Hop artist AKU-MATU, Apache Country and Western balladeer Boe Titla, and Inocencio Ramos and Carlos Miñana performing Nasa flute music from the Colombian Andes. The concert will be held on Friday, October 1st at 7:00 pm in the Glicker-Milstein Theater at the Diana Center, Barnard College, 117th and Broadway. Admission is free.

KEYNOTE ADDRESSES (Sat. Oct. 2,  11 a.m.—12:30 p.m.) - Davis Auditorium

Indigeneity, Music and Rights: Mapping New Territories
Rosemary Coombe, Senior Canada Research Chair in Law, Communication and Culture, York University

Pütchipü'ü Men Who Have the Word as their Job
Wieldler Guerra, Anthropologist (Wayùu)

Additional support for this event generously provided by the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race at Columbia University (CSER).

The full program follows below:<--break- />

MUSIC AND INDIGENEITY IN THE AMERICAS
A conference and concert organized by
The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University

Friday, October 1
Sindeband East 414

9 – 11 a.m.    REPATRIATION AS COMMUNITY ACTIVISM

Moderator: Audra Simpson, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Columbia University

Aaron Fox, Associate Professor of Music and Chair, Department of Music, Columbia University
Chie Sakakibara, Faculty Fellow in Geography, Appalachian State University
Trevor Reed, PhD student in Ethnomusicology, Columbia University (Hopi)
Allison Akootchook Warden, Independent performing artist, Anchorage, Alaska (Iñupiaq)
Fannie Akpik, Assistant Professor, Iñupiaq Studies, University of Alaska Fairbanks (Iñupiaq)

11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
A CONVERSATION ABOUT MUSICAL BIOGRAPHIES

David Samuels, Associate Professor Music, New York University Lambert Titla, Musician (Apache)

12 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Lunch Break

1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Davis Auditorium (with coffee break) MODES OF MEDIATION AND COLLABORATION

Moderator: Frances Negro?n-Muntaner, Director, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race; Associate Professor, Departments of Latino/a Studies and English, Columbia U.

Indigenism, Performance and Politics in Nicaragua: Transnational and Transregional Perspectives
Alvaro Baca, Adjunct Lecturer and Supervisor of the International Human Rights Clinic, University of Oklahoma College of Law
Amanda Minks, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Honors College, University of Oklahoma

Collaboration, Kindness and Control: Avoiding the Binaries
Beverley Diamond, Canada Research Chair in Traditional Music/Ethnomusicology, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Bones: An Aboriginal Dance Opera - Collaboration, Appropriation or Something?
Sadie Buck, Songwriter, Composer, Performer (Seneca, Turtle Clan)

7:00 Free Concert Native Sounds North&South: Traditional and Popular Music from Alaska, Arizona and the Andes
The Glicker-Milstein Black Box Theatre at the Diana Center, Barnard College, 117th Street and Broadway
for more information on this concert click here

Saturday, October 2, Davis Auditorium

9a.m.–11a.m. SCHOOLS, THE LAW, AND OTHER INSTITUTIONAL MEDIATIONS

Moderator: Klisala Harrison, Postdoctoral Teaching and Research Fellow, Ethnomusicology, University of British Columbia School of Music

Nasa puyiwejxa, piyayat, tuhkana fxi'zenxi: Music, School and the Nasa Indigenous Movement (Colombia)
Carlos Min?ana, Anthropologist, Universidad Nacional de Colombia
Inocencio Ramos, Linguist, Indigenous Educator (Nasa)

Practices of Indigenous Music Research in the Brazilian Amazon
Deise Lucy Montardo, Professor of Anthropology, Federal University of Amazonas

11 a.m.—12:30 p.m. KEYNOTE ADDRESSES

Indigeneity, Music and Rights: Mapping New Territories
Rosemary Coombe, Senior Canada Research Chair in Law, Communication and Culture, York University

Pu?tchipu?'u? Men Who Have the Word as their Job
Wieldler Guerra, Anthropologist (Wayu?u)


12 :30– 1:30 p.m. Lunch Break

1:30 – 5:00 p.m. (with coffee break) MEDIA AND PLACE

Moderator: J. Kehaulani Kauanui , Associate Professor of American Studies and Anthropology, Wesleyan University; Producer and Host of "Indigenous Politics" Radio, WESU (Kanaka Maoli)

Collaborative Indigenous Film: OWNERS OF THE WATER
Laura R. Graham, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Iowa

Ethnicity and territory in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta in Colombia: Palabras Mayores: revelaciones desde el corazo?n del mundo (Exalted Words: Revelations from the Heart of the World)
Pablo Mora, Anthropologist, Audio-Visual Collective Zhigoneshi Amado Villafan?a, Videographer (Arhuaco)

5:00 – 6:00 p.m. Closing Discussion

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