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Sounding China in the World: A Workshop (Friday, Dec. 3, 9AM-5:30PM)

Event Start: 
Saturday, December 3, 2016 - 9:30am
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

SOUNDING CHINA IN THE WORLD: A WORKSHOP

Friday, December 2, 2016
701C Dodge Hall, 2960 Broadway, New York, NY 10027 

Joseph-Marie Amiot, Mémoire sur la musique des Chinois , tant anciens que modernes

Sounding China in the World: A Workshop on Musical Circulations to and from China from the Qing Dynasty Through the Present

9:30am-5:30 pm, 701c Dodge Hall

In this workshop, we will investigate the evolving place of China in the world and of the world in China through the important and underutilized lens of music. Examining circulations of music and their connections to processes of knowledge formation, we will consider the ways diverse musics have been transmitted, reformulated, and integrated in contexts ranging from the eighteenth century Qing court to contemporary southern China. We aim to generate productive dialogue through transhistorical perspectives across and through disciplines in order to reassess China’s central role in the formation of a globalized culture from the Enlightenment through the present.

Schedule

9:30 Welcome (Susan Boynton)

10:00 Session 1 (Chair: Susan Boynton)

10:00-11:00: Qingfan Jiang (Music, Columbia), Unfinished Mission: Jesuits and the Circulation of Musical Knowledge in the Encyclopedic Century (respondent: Paize Keulemans) 

11:00-12:00: Paize Keulemans (East Asian Studies, Princeton), An Aural Account of the Fall of the Ming Dynasty: Critical Listening in Chinese Rumor, Jesuit History, and Dutch Tragedy of the 17th Century

(respondent: Qingfan Jiang)

2:00-3:00: Session 2 (Chair: Wei Shang, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia)

2:00-3:00: Adam Kielman (Music, Columbia), Mobilities, Musical Cosmopolitanism, and Southern China’s Transforming Music Industry (respondent: Fred Lau)

3:00-4:00: Fred Lau (Music, University of Hawaii), “Are we there yet?” 1960s Hong Kong Pop Music and Modernity (respondent: Adam Kielman)

4:00-4:30 Break 

4:30-5:30 Final Discussion 

Sponsors: Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Department of Music, Columbia Global Centers | Beijing

SYMPOSIUM: Pacific Roots Music, Pacific Routes Music: Tracking Marshallese & Hawaiian Music Across the Pacific - Friday Oct. 12,

Event Start: 
Friday, October 12, 2012 - 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)

In Conjunction with the 2012 "Native Sounds North and South" Concert Series presentation of Hawai'ian Guitar Virtuoso Cyril Pahinui on Oct. 13, 2012, The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University Presents a Symposium on Friday Oct. 12, 2012:

Pacific Roots Music, Pacific Routes Music: Tracking Marshallese and Hawaiian Music Across the Pacific

Friday October 12, 4-6PM
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)
Free and Open to the Public

Prof. Kevin FellezsProf. Kevin Fellezs
“Listen But Don’t Ask Question”: Ki ho’alu and Listening for the Sounds of Hawaiian-ness
Kevin Fellezs is Assistant Professor of Music and African-American Studies at Columbia University.


Jessicca Schwartz, Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Music, Columbia University Jessica Schwartz, PhD
"Home Sweet Home": Marshallese Musical Reflections on Religion, Human Rights,&Diplomacy in "Free   Association" Diaspora

Jessica Schwartz is a Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Music at Columbia University.


Prof. Kehaulani Kauhanui, Wesleyan University

Discussant: Prof. J. Kehaulani Kauanui
Wesleyan University

J. Kehaulani Kauanui is Associate Professor of Anthropology and American Studies at Wesleyan University.


_____________________________

Pacific roots symposium poster

Native Music Today Symposium: Dr. Jessica Bissett-Perea and Lauren Amsterdam (Friday Sept. 21, 4PM)

Event Start: 
Friday, September 21, 2012 - 2:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall -- Center for Ethnomusicology

In association with "Native Sounds North and South" concert on Sept. 22 (Saturday), The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a symposium:

Indigenous Music Today: Inuit Cosmopolitanism and Native American Hip-Hop with Dr. Jessica Bissett-Perea and Lauren Amsterdam

Friday Sept. 21
2-4:30PM
701C Dodge Hall  (Center for Ethnomusicology)
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Reception to Follow

Dr. Jessica Bissett Perea
Jessica Bissett-Perea, PhD
(Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow, Dept. of Music, Univ. of California, Berkeley, PhD in Musicology, UCLA, 2011)

“Sounding Traditions of Inuit Cosmopolitanism in ‘Flying Wild Alaska’”
This paper explores circuits of Inuit cosmopolitanism as represented through the soundscapes and imagery of the Discovery Channel’s documentary-style reality television series “Flying Wild Alaska,” (2011-2012). When compared to its counterparts (e.g. “Deadliest Catch,” “Ice Road Truckers,” and “Gold Rush: Alaska”), “Flying Wild Alaska” is notable for portraying the diversity and mobility of Alaska Native and Inuit cultures, in part through the show’s use of contemporary Inuit music as a backdrop to portrayals of modern life in the arctic. From professionalized traditional drumsongs to funk- and jazz-influenced “Inuit World Music,” my musicocultural analysis will illuminate the longer history of Inuit cosmopolitanism throughout the circumpolar region and make audible the literal and figurative histories of Native migration between rural and urban spaces.
_________________________
Lauren Amsterdam

Lauren J. Amsterdam
(MA, African-American Studies, Columbia University)


"All the Eagles and the Ravens in the House Say Yeah! (Ab)Original Hip Hop Artists and Styles of Heritage"

Young people across Native North America and the First Nations are making beats, spitting rhymes, telling stories, and taking direct action to build the future now. Hip hop artists are reppin’ a radicalized (ab)original heritage that is “everywhere,” but most of all, in hip hop, challenging the limitations of poverty, invisibility, and social dislocation. Confronting the symptoms of invasion—racism, poverty, police violence, inter-generational trauma, and “haters”—artists profoundly demonstrate that the materiality of hip hop is a way of not dying, and of moving past the necessity of surviving to a fuller, thriving political and cultural life. While artists are indeed inheriting loss, they choose to move with loss, not past it, being playful and political with real and imagined memories. Rather than mourn who they would or could have been if the past was different, artists orient themselves towards the potentiality of the future through self-love and communal care, shedding the settler nation's inculcation of shame and alienation.

______________

Discussants: AKU-MATU (Allison Warden), Prof. John-Carlos Perea.


COMING UP OCT. 13: MASTER OF HAWAI'IAN SLACK KEY GUITAR CYRIL PAHINUI, 7PM IN DAVIS AUDITORIUM, SAT 10/13/12

John-Carlos Perea and AKU-MATU to Perform at Columbia on Sept. 22 (Native Sounds North and South)

Event Start: 
Saturday, September 22, 2012 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Davis Auditorium, Schapiro Hall, NW corner of Columbia University Morningside Campus
The Center for Ethnomusicology's "Native Sounds North&South" Series presents concert of Jazz and Hip-Hop by Native American/Native Alaskan recording artists:

JOHN-CARLOS PEREA
and Elliot Humberto Kavee

and

AKU-MATU


Saturday September 22, 2012
Davis Auditorium, Schapiro Center (click for map)
Columbia University Morningside Campus
7PM-10PM
Free and Open to the Public

(see below for associated class and symposium)

FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE (let us know you're coming!)
CONCERT PROGRAM (PDF)
PHOTO CREDIT: Stephen Butler, Canyon Records, 2011 JOHN-CARLOS PEREA and
ELLIOT HUMBERTO KAVEE


Click thumbnail for full-sized image
PHOTO CREDIT: Stephen Butler, Canyon Records, 2011

_____________________________

AKU-MATU (ALLISON WARDEN) credit: selfAKU-MATU (Allison Warden)
Iñupiaq performance artist.


Click thumbnail for full-sized image




About the artists:

John-Carlos Perea (Mescalero Apache, Irish, German, Chicano) has maintained an active career as a performer and recording artist in San Francisco’s Jazz and World music scenes since 1997. First Dance, his debut recording as a leader, featured John-Carlos’ original musical compositions and performances on electric bass, cedar flute, and pow-wow singing. 

John-Carlos has recorded on over a dozen albums as a sideman and, in 2007, he won a GRAMMY® (Best New Age Album [Vocal or Instrumental]) as a member of the Paul Winter Consort for pow-wow and cedar flute songs contributed to "Crestone" (http://tinyurl.com/7dn58vj). His most recent release is "Waking from the Roots" by Coyote Jump, a new collaborative ensemble featuring John-Carlos on cedar flute with composer Colin Farish, available from Canyon Records (http://tinyurl.com/7u2rntk).

John-Carlos is also Assistant Professor in the Department of American Indian Studies, College of Ethnic Studies, at San Francisco State University. He received his BA (2000) in Music from San Francisco State University and his MA and Ph.D. (2005/2009) in Music from the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include contemporary urban American Indian musical cultures, pow-wow music and dance, New Age music, and the music of saxophonist Jim Pepper. John-Carlos is presently authoring “Intertribal Native American Music in the United States,” a textbook and CD package under contract to Oxford University Press.

________

Allison Warden (AKU-MATU) is an Iñupiaq Eskimo Inter-Disciplinary Artist with a passion for the self-determination of Indigenous Peoples.  She raps under the name AKU-MATU and loves working with young people, empowering them through the use of theatre and music. She creates her own beats for her rhymes, sampling traditional sounds and inserting her Iñupiaq language into her songs.  She lives in Anchorage, Alaska and has close ties to her home community of Kaktovik, Alaska. 

Her one-woman show, “Ode to the Polar Bear” has toured extensively across Alaska and the lower-48 and has been re-worked into a completely new and longer piece, titled “Calling All Polar Bears” which debuted at Intermedia Arts with Pangea Theatre in Minneapolis, Minnesota in November 2011.  She acted in Andrew MacLean’s film, “On the Ice” that premiered at Sundance in 2011.  In 2009, she was part of the “virtual subsistence” exhibition at MTS Gallery and coordinated over 25 people to participate in a performance which focused on the incident with the Point Hope caribou and land use issues.   Allison was the MC for the Elders and Youth Convention at the Alaska Federation of Natives Conference in October of 2010 and 2011 and was active in presenting about language revitalization. 

Allison is an engaged community member, passionate about awakening Indigenous youth to their potential and voice.  She is most excited about working on her AKU-MATU album and about expressing herself through writing more poetry, plays and a screenplay.  She can be reached through her website, www.aku-matu.com


RELATED EVENTS:
Thursday Sept. 20

Dodge  Hall 622
Jessica Bissett Perea, John-Carlos Perea, Allison Warden, and Lauren Amsterdam visit "Music in Contemporary Native America," 6:10-7:25
This is open to non-members of the class, but please RSVP to aaf19@columbia.edu for permission to attend, by Wed. Sept. 18.

Friday Sept. 21
701C Dodge Hall  (Center for Ethnomusicology)
2-4:30PM

Symposium: Indigenous Music Today
Dr. Jessica Bissett Perea Jessica Bissett-Perea, PhD
(Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow, Dept. of Music, Univ. of California, Berkeley)
Jessica Bissett Perea
(click thumbnail for full-sized image)

“Sounding Traditions of Inuit Cosmopolitanism in ‘Flying Wild Alaska’”
This paper explores circuits of Inuit cosmopolitanism as represented through the soundscapes and imagery of the Discovery Channel’s documentary-style reality television series “Flying Wild Alaska,” (2011-2012). When compared to its counterparts (e.g. “Deadliest Catch,” “Ice Road Truckers,” and “Gold Rush: Alaska”), “Flying Wild Alaska” is notable for portraying the diversity and mobility of Alaska Native and Inuit cultures, in part through the show’s use of contemporary Inuit music as a backdrop to portrayals of modern life in the arctic. From professionalized traditional drumsongs to funk- and jazz-influenced “Inuit World Music,” my musicocultural analysis will illuminate the longer history of Inuit cosmopolitanism throughout the circumpolar region and make audible the literal and figurative histories of Native migration between rural and urban spaces.

Lauren AmsterdamLauren J. Amsterdam
(MA, African-American Studies, Columbia University)
"All the Eagles and the Ravens in the House Say Yeah! (Ab)Original Hip Hop Artists and Styles of Heritage" 


Young people across Native North America and the First Nations are making beats, spitting rhymes, telling stories, and taking direct action to build the future now. Hip hop artists are reppin’ a radicalized (ab)original heritage that is “everywhere,” but most of all, in hip hop, challenging the limitations of poverty, invisibility, and social dislocation. Confronting the symptoms of invasion—racism, poverty, police violence, inter-generational trauma, and “haters”—artists profoundly demonstrate that the materiality of hip hop is a way of not dying, and of moving past the necessity of surviving to a fuller, thriving political and cultural life. While artists are indeed inheriting loss, they choose to move with loss, not past it, being playful and political with real and imagined memories. Rather than mourn who they would or could have been if the past was different, artists orient themselves towards the potentiality of the future through self-love and communal care, shedding the settler nation's inculcation of shame and alienation.
______________

Discussants:
AKU-MATU (Allison Warden), Prof. John-Carlos Perea


COMING UP OCT. 13: MASTER OF HAWAI'IAN SLACK KEY GUITAR CYRIL PAHINUI, 7PM IN DAVIS AUDITORIUM, SAT 10/13/12


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