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Congratulations to Dr. Sara Snyder!


We warmly congratulate Dr. Sara Snyder, who successfully defended her dissertation on Cherokee language translational poetics and early childhood immersion education on Friday, May 6, 2016.  Her dissertation was sponsored by Prof. Aaron Fox, and her committee included Profs. Bambi Schieffelin (Anthropology, NYU), David Samuels (Music, NYU), Ana Maria Ochoa (Music, Columbia), and CU ethno alumna Prof. Amanda Minks (Anthropology, Oklahoma).

Dr. Snyder has also recently been appointed as a visiting assistant professor of anthropology and sociology at Western Carolina University in 2016-17.

Congratulations Dr. Sara Snyder!



Photo, left to right: D. Samuels, B. Schieffelin, S. Snyder, A. Ochoa, and A. Fox

Barnard Music Major Thesis Presentations Thursday May 12, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 701C Dodge Hall


You are warmly invited to attend a presentation of senior thesis projects completed by graduating Barnard College Music/Ethnomusicology majors Esther Adams, Anna Koeck Ehrman, Jenny Payne, Gen Ambrose, and Delaney Ross.  

Featuring five 20-minute oral presentations, the event will occur on 


THURSDAY MAY 12
4:15 to 6:15PM 
701C Dodge Hall, The Center for Ethnomusicology

Reception to Follow

We are very proud of our thesis-writing students and encourage you to come and hear about their diverse and fascinating research projects. 
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The presentations will be in the order below; if you are unable to attend the entire event you are welcome to drop in and out.  

4:15-4:35PM  Esther Adams — "A Naïve Mélange:" Examining Racialized Properties of Sound in Harry Lawrence Freeman’s "Jazz Opera” Voodoo 

4:40-5:00PM Anna Koeck Ehrman — The Colonial Legacy of the Ethnomusicological Archive: An Exploration of ILAM’s African Music Repatriation Project

5:05-5:25PM Jenny Payne  — Now Let's Get in Formation: the Personal and Political of "Beyoncé feminism"

5:30-5:50PM Genevieve Ambrose — Wizard Rock Heartthrobs: Power, Gender and Economics in Harry Potter Musical Fandom

5:55-6:15PM Delaney Ross — Our Hawai'i: Environmental Protest Music on the Big Island of Hawai’i

For information contact Prof Fox, aaf19@columbia.edu

Adam Kielman Wins Julie How Fellowship from Weatherhead Institute!

Adam Kielman

The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates PhD student Adam Kielman, who has been awarded the Julie How Fellowship by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute. The award provides support for a year of dissertation write-up to a student in history or the social sciences with a research focus on China.


Mr. Kielman, who is also an alumnus of Columbia College (EALAC major, LAJPP performer) is completing a dissertation on local popular music and politics in China under the sponsorship of Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa. 

Congratulations Adam!

Els Lagrou -- Cashinahua Song-Images: Reflections on an Amerindan Relational Aesthetics (Thurs April 28, 5pm)

Event Start: 
Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 5:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Spring 2016 Ethnomusicology Colloquium Series Presents: 

Cashinahua Song-Images: Reflections on an Amerindan Relational Aesthetics

Els Lagrou  

(Associate Professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) Graduate Program in Sociology and Anthropology, CNPq (National Council for Scientific and Technological Development) Researcher Coordinator of NAIPE –Center of Amerindian Studies)

April 28, 2016 5:00 pm 
701c Dodge Hall 
Columbia University Center for Ethnomusicology
Free and Open to the Public

Columbia University Morningside Campus

PhD Alumna Dr. Lauren Flood Appointed Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at MIT!

The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates PhD alumna Dr. Lauren Flood, who has been appointed as a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Dr. Lauren Flood



















Lauren Flood earned the Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology from Columbia in 2015.  She researches sound technologies and experimental instrument building practices in the contexts of the do-it-yourself ethos, maker culture, and popular and experimental music scenes. She held a Whiting Fellowship for her dissertation, “Building and Becoming: DIY Music Technology in New York and Berlin,” with fieldwork supported by the Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies and the National Science Foundation. Lauren’s work is situated at the nexus of music, anthropology, sound studies, and science and technology studies. She engages with dialogs on critical organology, creativity and knowledge production, histories and aesthetics of sound and recording practices, vernacular technologies and everydayness, ethics and labor in the music industry, alternative methods in science and technology education, and the contemporary sense of self as mediated through the arts.

At Columbia, she has been a teaching fellow in Music Humanities and Asian Music Humanities, the graduate assistant for the Center for Ethnomusicology, an editorial board member and reviews editor for Current Musicology, and on the organizing committee of the Columbia Music Scholarship Conference. She has presented her work at annual meetings of the Society for Ethnomusicology, the American Anthropological Association, the Society for the Social Studies of Science, and the EMP Pop Conference.

Prior to her graduate studies, Lauren completed her undergraduate degree at Drexel University, with a major in music industry and a minor in anthropology. While living in Philadelphia, she studied and performed as a guitarist, worked in copyrights and licensing, and assisted with research at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. She also completed field schools in Latin American ethnomusicology and archaeology, maintaining a long-standing interest in Mesoamerica and the modern Mayan region.

Dr. Flood's Columbia PhD dissertation was advised by Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa. 

PhD Alumnus Timothy Mangin Appointed Assistant Professor of Music at Boston College!



The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates 2013 PhD program alumnus Dr. Timothy Mangin, who has just been appointed as a tenure track Assistant Professor of Music at Boston College.  

Timothy Mangin is an ethnomusicologist and musician researching the intersection of popular music, race, ethnicity, religion, and cosmopolitanism in West Africa and the African Diaspora. He received his doctorate from Columbia University in 2013 and received fellowships from the Columbia University’s Center for Comparative Literature and Society, St. Lawrence University’s Department of Music, Mellon Foundation, the Foreign Language Areas Studies Program and a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Research Abroad Program.  He taught at Columbia University, New York University, St. Lawrence University, and the City University of New York. An improvisational flutist, Tim founded St. Lawrence University’s Jazz and Improv Ensemble and also studies mbira and is a member of Capoeira Brasil.  His writings have appeared in the edited volumes Begegnungen: The World Meets Jazz and Uptown Conversations: The New Jazz Studies as well as reviews in The Yearbook for Traditional Music and Ethnomusicology On-Line. Tim is working on a book examining indigenous cosmopolitanism through the intersection of the Senegalese urban dance music called mbalax and the practice of black, Wolof (the dominant ethnic group), gendered, and Muslim identities. He is also exploring blackness in Senegalese hip hop and the dynamics of improvisation in New York City’s underground hip hop and jazz scene.  The Digital Humanities is a key part of Tim’s pedagogy and research that began when he worked at Columbia’s Institute for Research in African American Studies on the Malcolm X Project, under the direction Manning Marable, and further developed with students at The City College of New York.  

Dr. Mangin's Columbia PhD dissertation, on Senegalese mbalax, was advised by Prof. George Lewis. 

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