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Adam Kielman Appointed Assistant Professor at Chinese University of Hong Kong, Completes Doctorate

The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates our newest PhD alumnus, Dr. Adam Kielman!  Dr. Kielman, who also holds his undergraduate degree in East Asian Studies from Columbia, defended his dissertation, Zou Qilai!: Musical Subjectivity, Mobility, and Sonic Infrastructures in Postsocialist China, on Dec. 1, 2016.  His dissertation, abstracted below, was advised by Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa, and his committee included Profs. Chris Washburne, Kevin Fellezs, Fred Lau (U Hawai'i), and Timothy Oakes (U Colorado/Boulder).

We also warmly congratulate Dr. Kielman on his acceptance of an Assistant Professorship in Music at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, which he will begin in January, 2017.  

Congratulations to Adam!

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Adam Kielman: Zou Qilai!: Musical Subjectivity, Mobility, and Sonic Infrastructures in Postsocialist China
Abstract

This dissertation is an ethnography centered around two bands based in Guangzhou and their relationships with one of China’s largest record companies. Bridging ethnomusicology, popular music studies, cultural geography, media studies, vocal anthropology, and the anthropology of infrastructure, it examines emergent forms of musical creativity and modes of circulation as they relate to shifts in concepts of self, space, publics, and state instigated by China’s political and economic reforms. Chapter One discusses a long history of state-sponsored cartographic musical anthologies, as well as Confucian and Maoist ways of understanding the relationships between place, person, and music. These discussions provide a context for understanding contemporary musical cosmopolitanisms that both build upon and disrupt these histories; they also provoke a rethinking of ethnomusicological and related linguistic theorizations about music, place, and subjectivity. Through biographies of seven musicians working in present-day Guangzhou, Chapter Two outlines a concept of “musical subjectivity” that looks to the intersection of personal histories, national histories, and creativity as a means of exploring the role of individual agency and expressive culture in broader cultural shifts.Chapter Three focuses on the intertwining of actual corporeal mobilities and vicarious musical mobilities, and explores relationships between circulations of global popular musics, emergent forms of musical creativity, and an evolving geography of contemporary China. Chapter Four extends these concerns to a discussion of media systems in China, and outlines an approach to “sonic infrastructures” that puts sound studies in dialogue with the anthropology of infrastructure in order to understand how evolving modes of musical circulation and the listening practices associated with them are connected to economic, political, and cultural spatialities. Finally, Chapter Five examines the intersecting aesthetic and political implications of popular music sung in local languages (fangyan) by focusing on contemporary forms of articulation between music, language, listening, and place. Taken together, these chapters explore musical cosmopolitanisms as knowledge-making processes that are reconfiguring notions of self, state, publics, and space in contemporary China.

Sounding China in the World: A Workshop (Friday, Dec. 3, 9AM-5:30PM)

Event Start: 
Saturday, December 3, 2016 - 9:30am
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

SOUNDING CHINA IN THE WORLD: A WORKSHOP

Friday, December 2, 2016
701C Dodge Hall, 2960 Broadway, New York, NY 10027 

Joseph-Marie Amiot, Mémoire sur la musique des Chinois , tant anciens que modernes

Sounding China in the World: A Workshop on Musical Circulations to and from China from the Qing Dynasty Through the Present

9:30am-5:30 pm, 701c Dodge Hall

In this workshop, we will investigate the evolving place of China in the world and of the world in China through the important and underutilized lens of music. Examining circulations of music and their connections to processes of knowledge formation, we will consider the ways diverse musics have been transmitted, reformulated, and integrated in contexts ranging from the eighteenth century Qing court to contemporary southern China. We aim to generate productive dialogue through transhistorical perspectives across and through disciplines in order to reassess China’s central role in the formation of a globalized culture from the Enlightenment through the present.

Schedule

9:30 Welcome (Susan Boynton)

10:00 Session 1 (Chair: Susan Boynton)

10:00-11:00: Qingfan Jiang (Music, Columbia), Unfinished Mission: Jesuits and the Circulation of Musical Knowledge in the Encyclopedic Century (respondent: Paize Keulemans) 

11:00-12:00: Paize Keulemans (East Asian Studies, Princeton), An Aural Account of the Fall of the Ming Dynasty: Critical Listening in Chinese Rumor, Jesuit History, and Dutch Tragedy of the 17th Century

(respondent: Qingfan Jiang)

2:00-3:00: Session 2 (Chair: Wei Shang, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia)

2:00-3:00: Adam Kielman (Music, Columbia), Mobilities, Musical Cosmopolitanism, and Southern China’s Transforming Music Industry (respondent: Fred Lau)

3:00-4:00: Fred Lau (Music, University of Hawaii), “Are we there yet?” 1960s Hong Kong Pop Music and Modernity (respondent: Adam Kielman)

4:00-4:30 Break 

4:30-5:30 Final Discussion 

Sponsors: Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Department of Music, Columbia Global Centers | Beijing

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